urban bird control Articles

  • Bird control for commercial applications

    Building owners and businesses spend millions of dollars annually to deal with infestations and the problems associated with pest birds. The risks associated with these pests increase year after year as bird populations continue to grow in both inner city and urban environments. The fact is, these pests are out of their natural element and without proper bird control measures, they can wreak ...


    By Bird-B-Gone, Inc.

  • Coyote Control: How Urban Coyotes Are Invading Our Cities

    Coyotes have descended on our towns and cities… Can we peacefully coexist with this common pest animal? A distinctively American species, the coyote has lived in North America for more than a million years. But despite widespread attempts at eradication since the early 19th-century, coyotes have adapted and are now well-established in 49 states, including most major metropolitan ...


    By Bird-X Inc.

  • Bird-X sales team attends PestWorld 2016 in Seattle, WA

    During the third week of October, Bird-X account managers flocked to Seattle, Washington for PestWorld 2016; a four-day tradeshow put on by the National Pest Management Association (NPMA). PestWorld is an all-encompassing tradeshow, putting new information and products into the hands of everyone within the Pest Control community. PestWorld gives participants the opportunity to learn about ...


    By Bird-X Inc.

  • A study of the compatibility of habitat and water quality enhancement objectives in urban wetlands of southern California, USA

    With the rising urbanization of the coastal watersheds of California, requirements for control of urban runoff have created demand for treatment wetlands to improve surface water quality and attenuate storm flows. Concurrent with this need, significant wetland and riparian habitat have been lost. Pressure is mounting to restore, enhance, and create wetlands with multiple objectives (i.e., habitat ...

  • Estimating and Projecting Impervious Cover in the Southeastern United States

    Urban/suburban land use is the most rapidly growing land use class. Along with increased development inevitably comes increased ...

  • Assessing biodiversity in Europe — the 2010 report

    Executive summary This report confirms the finding of the EEA's 2009 report 'Progress towards the European 2010 biodiversity target' (EEA, 2009a) that Europe will not achieve its target of halting biodiversity loss by 2010. The present report considers the status and trends of pan-European biodiversity, and the implications of these trends for biodiversity management policy and ...

  • Retrofitting an Existing Stormwater System to Meet Numerical Effluent Limits - Stormwater Management at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport

    ABSTRACTOwned and operated by the Port of Seattle, Seattle-Tacoma International Airport (STIA) is the 28th busiest airport in the world. A Section 401 Water Quality Certification was issued to the Port to allow its expansion projects to proceed. This certification required existing portions of the airport be retrofitted to meet current stormwater standards. In addition, the Port’s renewed NPDES ...

  • Rapid decline in biodiversity: a threat to survival of humankind

    Biodiversity, coined from two words; Biological Diversity simply refers to the variety and variability of life forms (plants, animals and micro-organisms) on earth. In other words, it is the totality of genes, species, and ecosystems in a region. Thus, biodiversity can be divided into genetic diversity within specie, Specie diversity within a community in an ecosystem as well as the more complex ...


  • Envision 2050: The future of protected areas

    The idea of setting aside areas of land and water to be protected against human activities has become a staple of the conservation movement. But with that movement itself at a crossroads, it’s worth exploring just what protected areas will look like in the future. For this third installment ...


    By Ensia

  • What to do about the antidepressants, antibiotics and other drugs in our water

    As pharmaceuticals taint rivers and lakes, scientists search for solutions. There’s no way around it, the headlines are disturbing. And they come, not from tabloids or click-bait blogs, but from papers published in scientific journals. They describe fish and birds responding with altered behavior and reproductive systems to antidepressants, diabetes medication, and other ...


    By Ensia

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