wildlife law Articles

  • Remote island dependant on R.O. desal units

    On June 15, 2006, President Bush has signed into law, as a National Monument, 1200 miles of islands now formerly known as the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Coral Reef Ecosystem Reserve, making it the largest marine conservation area on Earth. For years, Lifestream Watersystems Inc.’s involvement with the area has been through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Hawaii and the hearty group of ...

  • New Map Documents Natural Resource Rights in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Many countries in Africa are rich with trees, wildlife, minerals, and other natural resources. But as new WRI research and an interactive map show, few national laws provide communities with strong, secure rights to the resources on their land. WRI conducted a systematic review of the national framework laws for five natural ...

  • Water monitoring commences in mines of West Africa

    As Sierra Leone looks to attract a new wave of mining investment in order to boost its economic profile, bringing water mine management standards in line with global best practices has become a priority. Government officials, academia, general citizens and companies have all become committed to improving standards with regards to water management in mining. As a key player in regulation ...


    By Aquaread Limited

  • Environmental management of coastal regions in the Caspian Sea

    Considering rapid population growth and migration, higher accumulation of communities is noticed in coastal areas. This is especially true with the coastal areas of the Caspian Sea. In the present investigation coastal areas between Jouybar to Behshahr region is selected for their special geographical and ecological locations. Further, adverse impacts of human, agriculture and industrial ...

  • What Pest Birds are Protected?

    Pest birds can become a costly nuisance to property owners. Some people have resorted to lethal means to eliminate their bird problem, but they don’t realize that doing so could be a violation of state and/or federal law. Many migratory birds are protected from harm by these laws and heavy fines have been levied against violators. Currently, there are only three birds that are not federally ...


    By Bird-B-Gone, Inc.

  • EPA Signs MOA on ESA; Establishes Interagency Working Group

    On January 31, 2018, Scott Pruitt, the Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), announced the establishment of an Interagency Working Group to Coordinate Endangered Species Act (ESA) Consultations for Pesticide Registrations and Registration Review.  EPA, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) (the Services) signed a ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

  • Bird Control in New Construction Sites

    When excavating a construction site you’re bound to come across numerous obstacles. While each one has its own level of difficulty to overcome, arguably the hardest to conquer is relocating wildlife from the site. Today we’re featuring a guest article from Emily Matlovich, writer for CADdetails’ blog  ...


    By Bird-X Inc.

  • Previous elephant killing spots offer clues to stem future deaths

    This morning the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service held an “ivory crush” event in Times Square in New York City, highlighting the huge problem that is elephant poaching and wildlife crime more generally. In addition to raising awareness of the problem, the point of pulverizing 1 ton of seized elephant tusks is to diminish demand and disrupt the ...


    By Ensia

  • Why land rights should be on the Rio+20 agenda

    As government leaders prepare for next month’s UN Conference on Sustainable Development (Rio+20) in Brazil, one issue is conspicuously absent from the agenda: land rights. Strong property rights—the rights for people to access, control, transfer, and exclude others from land and natural resources—create incentives to invest ...

  • The Trans-Pacific Partnership — friend or foe to the environment?

    On October 5, 2015, Canada announced that it had concluded negotiations of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (“TPP”). The TPP is a free trade agreement which will provide Canada with preferential and unprecedented access to the Asia-Pacific Region. The TTP is currently comprised of twelve Pacific-rim countries, representing a market of 800 million people. The TTP will need to be ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Overlapping Land and Natural Resource Rights Creates Conflict in Africa

    Ghana’s farming communities of Prestea, Himan, and Bondaye have been in conflict with the Plant North Pit gold mining operations of Golden Star Resources, a Canadian mining company, for more than a decade. The villagers are outraged with a foreign mining company taking large amounts of their agricultural land; the high levels of water, air, and noise pollution they now experience; and the ...

  • Suburban sprawl doesn’t have to be ecologically devastating

    As development gobbles up open space, conservationists take a fresh look at subdivisions with biodiversity in mind. Fort Collins, Colo., is a growing, vibrant college town with a typical American problem: Beyond its idyllic historic city center, cookie-cutter subdivisions are eating away at farm fields, ranches and forests. According to the ...


    By Ensia

  • One by one, states are giving consumers the right to know about chemicals in products

    From Vermont to Washington, an increasing number of states are requiring companies to report their use of chemicals of concern When evidence started to mount a few years ago around the adverse health effects of bisphenol A, an endocrine-disrupting chemical that’s used in many plastics, the marketplace took note. Companies found themselves under pressure to stop using BPA ...


    By Ensia

  • Saving Morocco’s endangered Barbary macaques

    Morocco’s Barbary macaque shouldn’t be endangered — the small primates native to North Africa reproduce well, consume a diverse omnivorous diet and can survive cold snowy winters that turn into blistering hot summers. And yet, according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources, this hearty and ...


    By Ensia

  • Sensitivity of Ecological Soil screening levels for metals to exposure model parameterization and toxicity reference values

    Ecological soil‐screening levels (Eco‐SSLs) were developed by the USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) for purposes of setting conservative soil screening values that can be used to eliminate the need for further ecological assessment for specific analytes at a given site. Eco‐SSLs for wildlife represent a simplified dietary exposure model solved in terms of soil ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • African Cranes, Wetlands and Communities

    It is encouraging to note that there are numerous crane and wetland conservation projects being implemented in various African countries. In this 11th edition of the African Cranes, Wetlands and Communities Newsletter, we have a mix of stories from the field covering three geographical regions – East Africa, Southern Africa and West Africa. The articles reflect the diverse issues that have ...


    By Wetlands International

  • Reducing the Economic Friction of Regulation

    Last month, we looked at two distinctly different bioenergy business models that are merging. Energy profit centers and waste cost-recovery facilities are learning the benefits of each other's business model. The resulting projects generate maximum revenue with lower production costs. The same kind of business model duality occurs in biomass energy regulation. There are more than two kinds of ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • If lead ammunition is bad for people and the environment, why do we still use it?

    Concerns about regulation, skepticism about the science and misperceptions about costs are slowing the transition to nontoxic alternatives. Andrea Goodnight knows firsthand what lead poisoning looks like. A veterinarian at the Oakland Zoo, Goodnight treats endangered California condors when testing shows dangerous levels of the toxic metal in their blood. If ...


    By Ensia

  • Why Eating Invasive Species Is a Bad Idea

    Gastronomy is no silver bullet for controlling invasive species. It seems like whenever an edible animal becomes an invasive pest, someone suggests that getting people to eat it will solve the problem. For instance, in 1998 the state of Louisiana induced famous New Orleans chefs to develop recipes for nutria, which ...


    By Ensia

  • Saving wetlands through responsible cultivation of soy

    Those consuming tofu and soy milk, but especially meat eaters and those driving a car should keep a critical eye on the impacts of soy cultivation. About 70 percent of soy cultivated is used for animal feed fulfilling the growing meat demands in the world, while the second largest driver of soy expansion is for the use of biodiesel. Whilst recognising these values of soy, its expansion has ...


    By Wetlands International

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