wildlife regulation Articles

  • Reducing the Economic Friction of Regulation

    Last month, we looked at two distinctly different bioenergy business models that are merging. Energy profit centers and waste cost-recovery facilities are learning the benefits of each other's business model. The resulting projects generate maximum revenue with lower production costs. The same kind of business model duality occurs in biomass energy regulation. There are more than two kinds of ...


    By BioCycle Magazine

  • Evaluating Risks to Wildlife from Coal Fly Ash Incorporating Recent Advances in Metals Risk Assessment

    Current scientific advances in metal/metalloid risk assessment were applied to evaluate risk to aquatic and riparian wildlife species potentially impacted by residual coal fly ash after clean‐up of an unprecedented large ash release into an aquatic environment, the first assessment of its kind. Risk was evaluated using multiple lines of evidence (LOE) including (1) tissue‐based risk assessment ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Furthering the derivation of predictive wildlife toxicity reference values for use in soil cleanup decisions

    The development of media‐specific ecological values for risk assessment includes the derivation of acceptable levels of exposure for terrestrial wildlife (e.g., birds, mammals, reptiles, and amphibians). Though the derivation and subsequent application of these values can be used for screening purposes, there is a need to identify toxicological effects thresholds specifically for making ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • A look at some contaminants regulated in drinking water

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulates just over 90 contaminants in public drinking water systems. They include manmade chemicals as well as naturally occurring contaminants from rocks and soil. A look at some of the contaminants that fall under federal or state regulations: ARSENIC: Enters drinking water through eroding natural deposits in the ground or mining and other ...


    By Associated Press

  • Top International News in Chemical Policy and Regulation

    AUSTRALIA Australia Releases Third Consultation Paper Concerning NICNAS Reform: On April 29, 2016, the National Industrial Chemicals Notification and Assessment Scheme (NICNAS) published the third consultation paper on its  ...


    By Acta Group

  • Erosion and Sediment Control: Navigating NPDES Regulations, the SWPPP, and Techniques for Compliance

    Erosion and Sedimentation: Why Are They a Problem? The US Environmental Protection Agency lists sediment as the single most common pollutant in rivers, streams, lakes, and reservoirs. With all the potentially harmful chemicals and substances in the world, it seems odd to many people that sediment—dirt, essentially—is singled out as the major culprit. Yet these particles of ...


    By FINN Corporation

  • Opinion: Slippers, Thieves and Smugglers – Dealing with the Illegal International Trade in Orchids

    The high standard of living in the developed world has fuelled the desire for wildlife and wildlife products. This is especially true in Europe where the 370 million people in the original 15 Member States make it one of the largest and most diverse markets in the world. For this reason there are extensive numbers of plants and animals in international trade and, thank goodness, the overwhelming ...


  • How to: Bioremediate chlorinated solvents without accumulating metabolites

    Chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs)such as tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene(TCE), commonly used as dry cleaningsolvents and degreasers, pose an ongoing threatto human health and wildlife when spilled intogroundwater. Through the injection of bioremediation productsinto the impacted groundwater, the chlorine atoms can be removedfrom these compounds in situ. However, ...


  • The Alberta Swan Hills Special Waste Treatment Centre expansion: environmental concerns

    This article examines the establishment and recent expansion of the high technology special Waste Management Treatment Centre at Swan Hills, Alberta. The focus is on a number of deficiencies in the expansion application and potential negative environmental impacts that may have been inadequately assessed by the review process then existing. These concerns include weaknesses in site geology, ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Ducks unlimited of North Dakota-case study

    Portable Pumping Units Case Study.  Project Locations:  Ducks Unlimited of North Dakota, Benson Wildlife Area, Date: 1997. Equipment Used: Two Crisafulli Engine-On-Frame Trailer Pumps, LP (Liquid Propane) powered. Project Description:  Ducks Unlimited of North Dakota needed to flood two areas in the state for duck habitation. ...


    By SRS Crisafulli, Inc.

  • Community management, self-interest and environmental preservation in the Amazon

    Community-based conservation supposedly meets mutual needs of people and natural resources. We examined decision-making behind management of resource extraction and agriculture in a community reserve in Peru. We conclude that self-interested motivations have the potential to create inadequate environmental protection for particular segments of the resource base. Community reserve members, ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Beyond LEED, Part 1

    Twenty years ago, few people recognized the need for concern about the negative environmental impact of building construction and the contribution that existing buildings make toward environmental pollution in the course of their regular, daily operations. Nevertheless, the damage done by the twentieth century’s burgeoning boon of construction was there for all to see: lost forests and wildlife ...


    By Full Sircle Farms

  • Protecting vernal pools: a model from Massachusetts, USA

    Abstract  Ephemeral ponded wetlands, often referred to as vernal pools in the wetland’s lexicon of the northeastern United States, are in need of protection from outright loss, catastrophic alteration, and disruption of natural processes in the surrounding landscape, because of their great importance to a characteristic wildlife fauna. The state of Massachusetts, USA provides a useful model ...


  • The case for establishing a board of review for resolving environmental issues: The science court in Canada

    Technology and scientific advancements are accelerating changes in society at a pace that is challenging the abilities of government regulatory agencies and legal courts to understand the benefits and costs of these changes to humans, wildlife, and their environments. The social, economic and political facets of concern, such as the potential effects of chemicals, complicate the preparation of ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Contaminants of emerging concern in reverse osmosis brine concentrate from indirect/direct water reuse applications

    Water shortage is becoming more common due to droughts and global population increases resulting in the increasing popularity of water reuse to create new water sources. Reverse osmosis (RO) membrane systems are popular in these applications since they can produce drinking water quality effluent. Unfortunately, RO systems have the drawback of generating concentrate streams that contain ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Portable pumping units case study

    Project Locations:  Ducks Unlimited of North Dakota, Benson Wildlife Area, Date: 1997. Equipment Used:  Two Crisafulli Engine-On-Frame Trailer Pumps, LP (Liquid Propane) powered. Project Description:  Ducks Unlimited of North Dakota needed to flood two areas in the state for duck habitation.  Both applications were fairly low head. ...


    By SRS Crisafulli, Inc.

  • Environmental management of coastal regions in the Caspian Sea

    Considering rapid population growth and migration, higher accumulation of communities is noticed in coastal areas. This is especially true with the coastal areas of the Caspian Sea. In the present investigation coastal areas between Jouybar to Behshahr region is selected for their special geographical and ecological locations. Further, adverse impacts of human, agriculture and industrial ...

  • Bottom‐up nutrient and top‐down fish impacts on insect‐mediated mercury flux from aquatic ecosystems

    Methyl mercury (MeHg) is one of the most hazardous contaminants in the environment; it adversely affects the health of both wildlife and humans. Recent studies have demonstrated that aquatic insects biotransport MeHg and other contaminants to terrestrial consumers, but the factors that regulate the flux of MeHg out of aquatic ecosystems via emergent insects have not been studied. We used ...


    By John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • Geotex® 801 Soil helps tame road through the wilderness case study

    The National Wild Turkey Federation has over 800,000 members that are involved with maintaining camps and grounds across the United States. This requires traversing un-paved roads in order to gain access to remote areas, while complying with wildlife agencies rules and regulations. This particular hunting ground posed significant challenges. The best solution to the problem of soft soils and a ...

  • Legislation Introduced In Senate To Phase Out RFS

    On March 18, 2015, Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) introduced S. 791, "The American Energy Renaissance Act of 2015." Representative Jim Bridenstine (R-OK) introduced companion legislation, H.R. 1487. The legislation would phase out the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS), approve the Keystone XL ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

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