New fertilizer industry gas cleaning technology achieves lower required emission levels

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Courtesy of Kimre, Inc.

All fertilizer plants produce dust and gases, such as ammonia (NH3) and acid fumes, which must be removed at very high efficiencies before venting to atmosphere. Familiar examples are granulation and prilling of nitrogenous products such as Urea which is the most widely used fertilizer in the world(1). Phosphatic fertilizer production produces dust and Fluorine compounds. Typical air treatment unit operations at fertilizer plants are cooling, followed possibly by a venturi scrubber, then either wet or dry ESP and finally packed bed wet scrubbing before stack discharge of the treated gas. It is common for customers to specify the maximum allowable amount of dust and trace gases that can be present in the stack emission as mg/Nm3 of urea dust and ammonia. Consider the examples presented in a paper last year at the 20th AFA(2):

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