John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Physiological effects and reduced tolerance following maternal metal exposure in the live‐bearing fish Gambusia affinis

0
This study assessed the effects of maternal copper or cadmium exposure in a live‐bearing fish. After a 10‐day exposure to background levels (control) or 0.15 µM copper or cadmium, we transferred gravid females to clean water. Once a female gave birth, we analyzed her newborn offspring for lipid peroxidation, elemental composition (copper, cadmium, and calcium), and metal tolerance. We raised other offspring till sexual maturity and analyzed their growth rate, incidence of abnormalities, and sex ratio. Our earlier research, using the same species and exposure design, demonstrated that cadmium and copper were transferred from gravid females to their offspring. The current study showed that offspring of copper‐exposed females had a reduced size‐at‐birth, developmental abnormalities, elevated tissue cadmium levels, and reduced tissue calcium levels. Offspring of cadmium‐exposed females had elevated levels of lipid peroxidation, developmental abnormalities, and lower tissue levels of both copper and calcium. No effects were detected with respect to offspring's growth rate or sex ratio. Offspring of metal‐exposed fish had a reduced tolerance to the metal that their female parent had been exposed to, and the tolerance showed an inverse relationship to the tissue metal level in the offspring. The latter indicates that the reduced tolerance was due to an increased body burden prior to the tolerance quantification. This study constitutes the first report in live‐bearing fishes showing that maternal metal exposure has a wide range of negative impacts on the offspring. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved

Customer comments

No comments were found for Physiological effects and reduced tolerance following maternal metal exposure in the live‐bearing fish Gambusia affinis. Be the first to comment!