ECA Geophysics

Potential-Field Methods

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Courtesy of ECA Geophysics

Magnetic Surveys

Designed and performed a total-field magnetometer survey of a 26-acre wood-waste landfill in Omak, Washington. This magnetic survey was designed to detect buried metallic debris to a depth of 12 feet and was augmented by an EM-34 soil conductivity (soil mapping) survey.

Total Field Magnetic Survey - Omak, WashingtonDesigned and performed (utilizing a total-field magnetometer) a gradiometer survey of an asphalt-paved parking lot for a US Bank property in Spokane, Washington. The presumed target was an underground storage tank (UST) and associated fuel lines. Processed data to isolate residual anomalies and successfully and accurately located an abandoned fuel line and associated tank removal debris.

Designed and performed a total-field magnetic survey at an abandoned Atlas Missile silo located north of Reardan, Washington. Processed data to isolate residual anomalies and determined that no suspected metallic debris existed at survey location.

Designed and performed a high resolution total field magnetic survey of an abandoned dump site at a pulpwood processing facility in Louisiana. Processed data to isolate residual anomalies, which were correctly interpreted to be buried metallic debris occurring within ten feet of the surface. Woodward-Clyde Consultants project.

Designed and performed (utilizing a two-sensor magnetometer) a gradiometer survey of an abandoned dump site at a pesticides manufacturing facility in Arkansas. Correctly interpreted depth and location of buried metallic debris and utilized such findings to direct a safe environmental drilling operation. This (gradiometer) method enabled an effortless, yet effective removal of the considerable cultural 'noise' that existed adjacent to the project area. Woodward-Clyde Consultants project.

Designed and performed a total-field magnetic survey in northwest Arkansas, in order to augment existing data (U.S. Geological Survey) that strongly indicate a large igneous mass at depth. All survey 'loops' were properly closed and double checked for accuracy before leaving the project area. Manually reduced data and performed forward modeling of same in order to determine the vertical distance to the top of the body; interpreted to be approximately 17,000 feet deep. Colorado School of Mines project.

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