Review of recent advances in detection of organic markers in fine particulate matter and their use for source

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ABSTRACT
Fine particulate matter is believed to be more toxic than coarse particles and to exacerbate health problems such as
respiratory and cardiopulmonary diseases. Specific organic compounds within atmospheric fine particulate material can be used to differentiate specific inputs from various emissions and thus is helpful in identifying the major urban air pollution sources that contribute to these health problems. Particular marker compounds that carry signature information about different emission sources (i.e., gasoline or diesel motor vehicles, wood smoke, meat cooking, vegetative detritus, and cigarette smoke) are reviewed. Aerosol organic types (e.g., from mass spectrometry data, which can also help in elucidation of carbonaceous material sources) are also discussed. Apportionment of the primary source contributions and atmospheric processes contributing to fine particulate matter and fine particulate organic material concentrations are outlined. This review provides an overview of the latest developments in chemical characterization approaches for identification and quantification of compounds in complex organic mixtures associated with fine atmospheric particles and their use in chemical mass balance (CMB) and positive matrix factorization (PMF) source apportionment models.

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