Technical Regulations and Standards on Climate Change in 2004 - 2005 - Cases of European Union, China, Japan and Korea

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In this globalised (and, in a sense, harmonised) world, a country and even an entity is not so free to play a game without complying with international and national rules of game. As usual, there exists dilemma on these rules of game in the real world. Even though international rules and national rules are closely interacting each other, in principle, international rules only provides commonly applicable minimum standards to countries and differentiate national rules are applied in a country under the broader international framework.

This would be the same case in regulating climate change in the world. As well known, there are two effective international rules on climate change, i.e. the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Kyoto Protocol. Based on these two international rules as minimum standards, countries are setting their national policies and measures addressing climate change in a common and differentiate manner.

For instance, “emissions trading” would be the most well-know term representing climate change to business people internationally. On the other hand, the International Energy Agency (IEA) has identified 920 policies and measures of 27 countries2 which are difficult to be known and identified to/by other parties and business entities. In this literature, I would like to draw special attention to differentiate national policies and measures on climate change and its implications by taking cases of the European Union, China, Japan and Korea.

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