John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

The effects of bupropion on hybrid striped bass brain chemistry and predatory behavior

0
Increased use of antidepressants has led to an increase in their detection in final treated wastewater effluents and receiving streams. Antidepressants are intended to modify human behavior by altering brain chemistry, and due to the high functional conservation of the receptor targets of antidepressant target receptors in vertebrates, aquatic organisms may be at risk. The antidepressant bupropion is designed to alter brain norepinephrine and dopamine concentrations in humans. The objective of this work was to understand if alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in the hybrid striped bass (Morone saxatilis x. Morone chrysops) brain by bupropion would alter this predator's ability to capture prey. We exposed hybrid striped bass (HSB) to bupropion in a static system for 6‐d followed by a 6‐d recovery period. During this 12‐d experiment, each HSB was fed four unexposed fathead minnows every three days, and the time it took the HSB to consume each of those four fathead minnows was quantified. After each feeding event, HSB brains were harvested and analyzed for changes several brain neurotransmitter concentrations, including serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine and many of their metabolites. While bupropion altered the concentration of dopamine and many of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter metabolite concentrations in the brains on day 3 of the exposure, it did not alter the HSB' time to capture prey. This suggests that alteration of dopaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in the HSB brain does not alter a predator's ability to capture prey. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved

Customer comments

No comments were found for The effects of bupropion on hybrid striped bass brain chemistry and predatory behavior. Be the first to comment!