The role of soil chemistry in wine grape quality and sustainable soil management in vineyards

0
- By: ,

Courtesy of IWA Publishing

ABSTRACT
This study aimed to establish if there is any evidence that soil mineralogical and/or chemical composition influence the composition and quality of wine grapes. In the initial phase of the study, soils and grapes were sampled in two riesling vineyards in South Australia. Soils were analysed for a wide range of total major and trace elements; soil cation extracts and grape juices were analysed for 27 trace elements by ICP-MS and ICP-AES. The results show that grape juice properties such as Baumé and titratable acidity (TA) are clearly correlated with several plant-available trace elements in the soil. Most notable of these are Ca, Sr, Ba, Pb and Si. Soil clay content also plays a (lesser) role. The cations Ca, Sr, Ba and Pb are closely similar to one another in their relationships to Baumé and TA, strongly indicating that the correlations are real. It is evident from our results that soil cation chemistry does indeed have an influence on wine grape composition. Such knowledge has the potential to be used in better tailoring grape varieties to soils, and in managing – or modifying – soils for optimum viticultural results and better wines in a more sustainable way.

Customer comments

No comments were found for The role of soil chemistry in wine grape quality and sustainable soil management in vineyards. Be the first to comment!