IWA Publishing

Thermally activated persulfate oxidation of NAPL chlorinated organic compounds: effect of soil composition on oxidant demand in different soil-persulfate systems

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This study investigates the interaction of persulfate with soil components and chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs), using thermally activated persulfate oxidation in three soil types: high sand content; high clay content; and paddy field soil. The effect of soil composition on the available oxidant demand and CVOC removal rate was evaluated. Results suggest that the treatment efficiency of CVOCs in soil can be ranked as follows: cis-1,2-dichloroethene > trichloroethylene > 1,2-dichloroethane > 1,1,1-trichloroethane. The reactions of soil components with persulfate, shown by the reduction in soil phase natural organics and mineral content, occurred in parallel with persulfate oxidation of CVOCs. Natural oxidant demand from the reaction of soil components with persulfate exerted a large relative contribution to the total oxidant demand. The main influencing factor in oxidant demand in paddy-soil-persulfate systems was natural organics, rather than mineral content as seen with sand and clay soil types exposed to the persulfate system. The competition between CVOCs and soil components for oxidation by persulfate indicates that soil composition exhibits a considerable influence on the available oxidant demand and CVOC removal efficiency. Therefore, soil composition of natural organics and mineral content is a critical factor in estimating the oxidation efficiency of in-situ remediation systems.

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