Transfer of class 1 integron-mediated antibiotic resistance genes from shiga toxin-producing escherichia coli to a susceptible e. Coli k-12 strain in storm water and bovine feces

0

Transfer of class 1 integron-mediated antibiotic resistance genes has been demonstrated under laboratory conditions. However, there is no information concerning the transfer of these genes in an agricultural environment. The present study sought to determine if integron-mediated streptomycin and sulfisoxazole resistance genes could be transferred from Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains 6-20 (O157:H7) and 7-63 (O111:H8) to the susceptible strain E. coli K-12 MG1655 in bovine feces (pH 5.5, 6.0, or 6.5) and storm water (pH 5, 6, 7, or 8) at 4, 15, and 28°C, which are average seasonal temperatures for winter, spring-fall, and summer, respectively, in the Griffin, GA, area. The results indicated that at 28°C, the integron-mediated antibiotic resistance genes were transferred from both of the STEC donors in bovine feces. Higher conjugation efficiencies were, however, observed in the conjugation experiments involving STEC strain 6-20. In storm water, the resistance genes were transferred only from STEC strain 6-20. Greater numbers of transconjugants were recovered in the conjugation experiments performed with pH 6.5 bovine feces and with pH 7 storm water. Antibiotic susceptibility tests confirmed the transfer of integron-mediated streptomycin resistance and sulfisoxazole resistance, as well as the transfer of non-integron-mediated oxytetracycline resistance and tetracycline resistance in the transconjugant cells. These results suggest that the antibiotic resistance genes in STEC could serve as a source of antibiotic resistance genes disseminated via conjugation to susceptible cells of other E. coli strains in an agricultural environment.

Customer comments

No comments were found for Transfer of class 1 integron-mediated antibiotic resistance genes from shiga toxin-producing escherichia coli to a susceptible e. Coli k-12 strain in storm water and bovine feces. Be the first to comment!