Water-related factors and childhood diarrhoea in African informal settlements. A cross-sectional study in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)

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Improved access to water is a key factor in reducing diarrhoeal diseases, a leading cause of death among children in sub-Saharan Africa. In terms of water access, sub-Saharan African cities are some of the worst off in the world, with 20% of populations supplied by an unimproved water source. This situation is even worse in informal settlement areas. Using cross-sectional data on access to water from a survey implemented in three informal neighbourhoods of the Ouagadougou Health and Demographic Surveillance System, logistic regressions are modelled to test the effect of different modalities of access to water on childhood diarrhoea. Our results show that the prevalence of diarrhoea in children is high: one-third of households with a child under 10 experienced an episode of childhood diarrhoea during the 2 weeks preceding the survey, even though 91% of the households surveyed have access to an improved water source. The results show that efforts to reduce childhood morbidity would be greatly enhanced by strengthening piped water access in informal settlement areas in Africa. In addition, this study confirms that, beyond the single measure of the main access to water, accurate variables that assess the accessibility to water are needed.

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