21 Articles found

Articles

indicates free access

  • What are the true costs of rising sea levels?

    What are the true costs of rising sea levels?

    A simple relationship between sea level rise and the massive potential costs of future coastal flooding has been established by scientists in Germany. As sea levels rise, the damage to human economies rises even faster. And as sea levels ...

    Tim Radford

  • Carbon capture could be costly and risky

    Carbon capture could be costly and risky

    There’s bad news for those who think that carbon dioxide can be removed from the atmosphere and stored deep in the Earth’s rocks. Even if carbon capture is possible, sequestration in the rocks is fraught because the gas can find ...

    Tim Radford

  • Carbon capture plans need urgent aid

    Carbon capture plans need urgent aid

    Governments may no longer be investing in the capture of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. But a new study says that doesn’t mean it’s a bad idea. It argues that the world just needs to think harder and spend more to make the technology ...

    Tim Radford

  • Shifting the burden – Should developing nations bear the load for emissions reduction?

    Shifting the burden – Should developing nations bear the load for emissions reduction?

    Pledges by the three titans of greenhouse gas emission – Europe, the US and China, which are the three biggest fossil fuel consumers – fall “far short of fair” and may not be nearly enough to contain global warming, according ...

    Tim Radford

  • How great are the risks posed by climate change?

    How great are the risks posed by climate change?

    The UK government says that climate change poses risks that demand to be treated as seriously as the threat of nuclear war. Scientists from the UK, US, India and China say in a report commissioned by the UK that deciding what to do about climate ...

    Alex Kirby

  • Outlook palls for fossil fuel investments

    Outlook palls for fossil fuel investments

    Like most central bank governors, Mark Carney, the Governor of the Bank of England, chooses his words carefully. So the financial community – and government policy makers − sat up and took notice earlier this month when ...

    Kieran Cooke

  • Climate helps to halve world wildlife in 40 years

    Climate helps to halve world wildlife in 40 years

    Human pressure has halved the numbers of many of the Earth’s wild creatures in just four decades, the Worldwide Fund for Nature says. While the main recorded threat to biodiversity comes from habitat loss and degradation, driven by ...

    Alex Kirby

  • Clean urban transport can drive emissions cuts

    Clean urban transport can drive emissions cuts

    Here’s a way to save $100 trillion and stop 1,700 million tonnes of carbon dioxide from getting into the atmosphere every year by 2050: cycle, walk or take public transport. A new report by the University of California Davis and the Institute ...

    Tim Radford

  • Political will is only barrier to 100% renewables

    Political will is only barrier to 100% renewables

    A new handbook shows how forward-looking communities around the world are already moving away from reliance on fossil fuels and generating their own power with 100% renewables − while also becoming more prosperous and creating jobs. The ...

    Paul Brown

  • Dietary effect on GHG emissions is hard to swallow

    Dietary effect on GHG emissions is hard to swallow

    The news is enough to make climate campaigners choke on their high-fibre breakfast cereal: if Americans adopted the dietary guidelines suggested by their own Department of Agriculture, greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) would actually go up by 12%. ...

    Tim Radford

  • Fresh water causes Antarctic seas to rise faster

    Fresh water causes Antarctic seas to rise faster

    Sea levels around Antarctica are rising faster than anywhere else in the southern ocean. The global average rise in ocean heights in the last 19 years has been 6cms, but the rise in seas around Antarctica is 2cms higher. This seemingly ...

    Tim Radford

  • Less snow won’t end blizzard hazard

    Less snow won’t end blizzard hazard

    There’s still a chance that some people who dream of a white Christmas will get their wish. While there may be less snow falling overall in a warming world, there will still be blizzards. Paul O’Gorman, an atmospheric scientist at the ...

    Tim Radford

  • China may be ready to kick coal habit

    China may be ready to kick coal habit

    There are still doubts. The statistics might be proved wrong. But it looks as if China might be starting to wean itself off its coal consumption habit. China produces and consumes nearly as much coal as the rest of the world combined. Coal, the ...

    Kieran Cooke

  • Climate and economy fan flames in Spain

    Climate and economy fan flames in Spain

    Climate change is gradually turning Spain into a fire zone – but it’s also the change in the economic climate that is inflaming the situation. A research group reports in the journal Environmental Science and Policy that a mix of ...

    Tim Radford

  • Health alert over fracking’s chemical cocktails

    Health alert over fracking’s chemical cocktails

    Fracking is once again in trouble. Scientists have found that what gets pumped into hydrocarbon-rich rock as part of the hydraulic fracture technique to release gas and oil trapped in underground reservoirs may not be entirely healthy. ...

    Tim Radford

  • Human factor speeds up glacial melting

    Human factor speeds up glacial melting

    The impact of human activity is melting the glaciers in the world’s mountain regions, and is doing so at an accelerating rate. Ben Marzeion, a climate scientist at the University of Innsbruck’s Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics, ...

    Tim Radford

  • Arctic warming blamed for dangerous heat waves

    Arctic warming blamed for dangerous heat waves

    Few people have heard of Rossby waves and even less understand them, but if you are sweltering in an uncomfortably long heat wave, then they could be to blame. New discoveries about what is going on in the atmosphere are helping to explain why heat ...

    Paul Brown

  • Tar oil pipeline’s hidden pollution danger

    Tar oil pipeline’s hidden pollution danger

    The oil industry has high hopes of the US$5.4 billion Keystone XL pipeline, which on completion is planned to carry crude oil from Canada’s tar sands in Alberta to refineries more than 2,000 miles away in Texas. With President Barack Obama ...

    Alex Kirby

  • US climate change debate heats up

    US climate change debate heats up

    Achieving progress in cutting back on greenhouse gas emissions and preventing serious global warming is never easy. But just how difficult a task that is became clear at a series of recent meetings across the US held to discuss the Obama ...

    Kieran Cooke

  • Rise in flights will outweigh carbon cuts

    Rise in flights will outweigh carbon cuts

    The aviation industry insists that it is making only a tiny contribution to global warming, with just 2% of global carbon dioxide emissions coming from its aircraft. The problem is the speed at which aviation itself is growing. One aircraft builder ...

    Alex Kirby