Elsevier

As the world’s leading publisher of science and health information, Elsevier serves more than 30 million scientists, students, and health and information professionals worldwide. We are proud to play an essential role in the global science and health communities and to contribute to the advancement of these critical fields.

Company details

1600 John F Kennedy Boulevard, Suite 1800 , Philadelphia , 19103 2398 Pennsylvania, USA

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Subsidiaries

Business Type:
Publishing company
Industry Type:
Publishing / Media / Marketing
Market Focus:
Globally (various continents)
Year Founded:
1880
Employees:
Over 1000

Elsevier is a world-leading provider of information solutions that enhance the performance of science, health, and technology professionals, empowering them to make better decisions, deliver better care, and sometimes make groundbreaking discoveries, that advance the boundaries of knowledge and human progress. Elsevier provides web-based, digital solutions — among them ScienceDirect, Scopus, Elsevier Research Intelligence, and ClinicalKey — and publishes nearly 2,200 journals, including The Lancet and Cell, and over 25,000 book titles, including a number of iconic reference works.

The company is part of Reed Elsevier Group PLC, a world leading provider of professional information solutions in the Science, Medical, Legal and Risk and Business sectors, which is jointly owned by Reed Elsevier PLC and Reed Elsevier NV. The ticker symbols are REN (Euronext Amsterdam), REL (London Stock Exchange), RUK and ENL (New York Stock Exchange).

Lead the way in advancing science, technology and health.

Our customers are doing momentous things, and we are uniquely positioned to show our customers the ‘art of the possible’.

For more than 130 years we have shared their commitment to transforming and advancing science, health and technology. We understand the worlds in which clinicians, educators, and academic and corporate researchers work, the outcomes they want to achieve and the challenges they face in achieving them.

We have a responsibility to use that understanding to create highly effective solutions that enable our customers to leverage the vast potential of information to advance science, health and technology in ways that they could not do alone, and to anticipate the new ways customers will want to use information in the future. That is what we mean by ‘leading the way’.

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Elsevier, the modern publishing company, was founded in 1880. It has evolved from a small Dutch publishing house devoted to classical scholarship into an international multimedia publishing company with over 20,000 products for educational and professional science and healthcare communities worldwide. Elsevier takes its name from the original House of Elzevir, a Dutch family publishing house founded in 1580.

Elsevier's history reflects a series of collaborations in the effort to advance science and health. These publishing collaborations with a group of scientific visionaries — ranging from Jules Verne to Stephen W. Hawking — created the foundation of scientific and medical publishing.

The efforts of the men and women dedicated to disseminating and using scientific and medical knowledge have been equally critical-- the editors, printers, librarians, nurses, doctors, engineers, information specialists and business people at the center of scientific and health publishing.

Relationships with other great science publishers such as North Holland, Pergamon, Mosby, W.B. Saunders, Churchill Livingstone and Academic Press have also been Integral to our success. These are just a few of the companies that are now part of the Elsevier family, bringing with them rich histories of their own. As the company moves forward, our founding motto remains apt: Non Solus-- Not Alone.

There is some debate over the meaning of the original Elzevir printer’s mark that is still used as Elsevier’s logo today and features an old man standing beneath a vine-entwined elm tree. It is inscribed with the Latin term Non Solus (not alone). The mark, first introduced by Isaac Elzevir (son of Lowys) in 1620, was featured on all Elzevir works from that time forth.

That the Elzevir family took pride in their mark is undisputed; what they intended it to mean is less clear. Although most scholars agree that the elm represents the tree of knowledge, they cannot agree on the meaning of the intertwined vine. The Parisian librarian Adry posited in 1806 that the elm tree entwined with the grapevine symbolized the bond between brothers Isaac and Abraham Elzevir and that the old man, a hermit, symbolized the seclusion of study. However, contemporary art historian Lucy Schlüter suggests more persuasively that the old man represents a wise scholar, a philosopher – evoking Erasmus’ image of Socrates sitting under a tree in a rural setting delivering fruitful and inspiring lectures.

In this context the intertwined tree and vine represent a fruitful relationship – and the story therefore carries a moral. As Erasmus said, referring to the classic metaphor of tree and vine: 'Like the vine which, though the most distinguished of all trees, yet needs the support of canes or stake or other trees which bear no fruit, the powerful and the learned need the help of lesser men.'

Viewed this way, the logo represents, in classical symbolism, the symbiotic relationship between publisher and scholar. The addition of the Non Solus inscription reinforces the message that publishers, like the elm tree, are needed to provide sturdy support for scholars, just as surely as scholars, the vine, are needed to produce fruit. Publishers and scholars cannot do it alone. They need each other. This remains as apt a representation of the relationship between Elsevier and its authors today – neither dependent, nor independent, but interdependent.