Genan

There is no other company like Genan. While aiming for sustainability and a greener planet, Genan is an innovative, high-end recycler of end-of-life tyres. Genan’s recycling technology was originally developed in 1990 and has undergone continuous development ever since. Genan employees are very proud to be part of the world’s largest recycling company processing end-of-life tyres from various vehicles.

Company details

Jegindovej 16 , Viborg , DK-8800 Denmark

Locations Served

Memberships

Business Type:
Manufacturer
Industry Type:
Waste and Recycling - Recycling Systems
Market Focus:
Globally (various continents)

Comprehensive life cycle assessment studies have shown that significant environmental benefits in areas like greenhouse gas emissions, acidification and fossil fuel demand are achieved if scrap tyres are recycled through the Genan method instead of incinerated or used in civil engineering filling operations. Material recycling through the Genan concept compared to other disposal methods saves 1-2 tonnes of CO2 per tonne of scrap tyres.
 
Genan’s recycling technology was originally developed in 1990 and has undergone continuous development ever since. Scrap tyres are separated into their basic components: rubber powder and granulate, steel and textile. The end products are uniform and clean and thus very well suited for high quality substitution applications, such as asphalt and bitumen modification, which makes roads stronger and more durable. This leads to saved maintenance costs and less time spent on repair works.  The use of Genan’s rubber powder in asphalt and bitumen modification avoids the production of virgin alternative modifiers like styrene-butadiene-styrene.
 
Recycled rubber granulate is also being used as high-quality infill material for artificial turf pitches. The use of artificial turf is highly recommended by international soccer organizations such as FIFA, as it helps the development of football in all parts of the world and makes it possible to play all year round at low maintenance costs.
 
However, even more interesting is the new Viborg-based production line for very fine, cryogenically milled rubber powder. This very fine rubber powder can substitute virgin raw material in the rubber and tyre industry; and when substituting virgin rubber in the production of new tyres, true cradle-to-cradle recycling is realised.

Genan - knowledge-based recycling concepts
'True recycling requires processing at a level where the output substitutes virgin materials.
Consequently this leads to avoided production and a profound saving of resources.'

Our vision:

All scrap tyres in the world must be recycled in the environmentally and economically most beneficial way.

Proven technology with 25 years of experience

At the end of the '70s, the idea of establishing a plant for the recycling of scrap tyres was born. The automotive industry was booming, and with very slowly degrading scrap tyres in landfills and nature, the waste problem needed to be addressed.

During the '80s, the idea was further developed, and in 1990, the first plant for recycling of scrap tyres became a reality in Viborg, Denmark. Throughout the '90s, the plant was continually improved and adjusted accordingly. The input capacity of the Danish plant was 35,000 tonnes of mixed scrap tyres (passenger car, van, truck, tractor and big earth moving tyres). By 2011, the capacity was doubled to 70,000 tonnes of tyre input.

In 2003, on the basis of the knowledge and experiences gained from the Danish plant, Genan opened a recycling plant in Oranienburg on the outskirts of Berlin, Germany (input capacity: 65,000 tonnes a year).

5 years later, in 2008, a plant with a similar capacity opened in Dorsten, NRW, Germany.

The Genan plant strategy in Germany was completed in 2010 when another 70,000 tonne plant started operation in Kammlach, Bavaria. 
 
Genan's most recently opened recycling plant, and the world's largest of its kind, was opened in Houston, Texas, USA, in 2014.

At the end of the 1970s, the automotive industry was booming, leading to a major waste problem with end-life-tyres, also commonly referred to as ELTs, scrap tyres or simply used tyres. As tyres only slowly degrade in landfill sites, an alternative disposal method was required. The idea of establishing a plant for the recycling of ELTs was born.

During the 1980s, this idea was further developed; and in 1990, the first Genan recycling plant for end-of-life tyres became a reality in Viborg, Denmark. The input capacity was 35,000 tonnes of mixed ELTs (i.e. tyres from passenger cars, vans, trucks, tractors and large earth-movers).

During the 1990s, the Danish factory was continually developed and improved; and in 2011, the intake capacity of the Viborg plant was doubled to 70,000 tonnes.

In 2003, on the basis of the knowledge and experience gained from the Danish plant, Genan opened its second tyre recycling plant in Oranienburg, on the outskirts of Berlin, Germany. The input capacity was 65,000 tonnes of ELTs per annum.

Five years later, in 2008, a 70,000 tonne plant opened in Dorsten, Germany. When a third German plant with a similar capacity started operation in Kammlach, Bavaria, in 2010, the Genan recycling plant strategy for Germany was complete.

Aiming to globally further the recycling of end-of-life tyres in the environmentally and economically most beneficial way, Genan expanded operations with its first non-European plant in 2014, when the world’s largest tyre recycling plant was opened in Houston, Texas, USA.

Believing that true recycling requires processing at a level where the output substitutes virgin raw material, Genan is continually investing time and resources in improving and identifying new applications for its products.

An R&D project on cryogenic milling and devulcanisation was initiated in 2011; and in 2015, production of cryogenic powder and devulcanised rubber was started up in Viborg. Genan now supplies ultra-fine rubber powder and devulcanised rubber of such high, consistent quality that it can even be used in the manufacture of new tyres. Genan thus pioneers by offering true cradle-to-cradle tyre recycling.