International HCH & Pesticides Association (IHPA)

The International HCH & Pesticides Association (IHPA) is an independent and non-political network of committed individuals that wants to draw international attention on the world-wide problems stemming from the production and use of HCH and other obsolete pesticides and its dangers for human health and the environment. The IHPA has made its full commitment to use all its strength and know how to contribute actively to the solution of problems stemming from the production and use of HCH and other obsolete pesticides in Central European and EECCA (Eastern European, Caucasus and Central Asia) Countries. The IHPA is thus working towards a regional strategy, based on support of all international and national stakeholders, to solve this serious regional problem by means of the creation and stimulation of an active network. This so called `True Living Network` will create the bases for a joint and broadly supported international platform able to prepare specific action programs.

Company details

Elmevej 14 , Holte , DK-2840 Denmark

Locations Served

Business Type:
Professional association
Market Focus:
Globally (various continents)
Year Founded:
1998

Objectives
The IHPA was founded in July 1998 with the aim of facilitating and promoting international co-operation and the exchange of experiences within management of pollution problems stemming from the production and use of HCH and other unwanted pesticides worldwide. Since September 2002, the IHPA has been officially registered as a Foundation in The Netherlands.

The IHPA supports the work towards sustainable solutions in production and application of pesticides.

The IHPA promotes international co-operation of all parties, involved in the field of pesticides such as international organisations, public authorities, crop protection organisations, producers, NGO’s, contractors, consultants an those who are concerned.

Pursuing the objectives, the IHPA organises the International HCH & Pesticides Forum and publishes the Forum proceedings and thereby makes information available. The IHPA co-operates with other dedicated organisations, wherever possible to achieve its objectives. Hence the IHPA seeks funding and sponsorship.

The IHPA does not pursue and political or commercial aims.

Our common goal is to free the world of obsolete pesticides. But we cannot do this alone. And we have established long-term partnerships with other organisations. Since a number of years we have teamed up with a combinations of Milieukontakt International, Tauw and The Netherlands Society for Nature and Environment (Stichting Natuur en Milieu) and have now executed three pilot demonstration projects in Moldova, Georgia and Kyrgyzstan on awareness and inventory, clean up and repackaging. So the start has been made to clean up the world but it is a long way to go.

IHPA is starting up the management the GEF project “Capacity Building on Obsolete and POPs Pesticides in Eastern European Caucasus and Central Asian (EECCA) countries” and will cooperate with the partners Milieukontakt International and Green Cross and the representatives of nine countries.

The programme will commence in the beginning of 2009.

The project comprises awareness raising and capacity building in 9 countries in the EECCA region, and shall strengthen the regional cooperation and exchange of know how and experiences.

The project will connect countries and experts, and facilitate preparation and implementation of clean-up actions in any of the countries in the region.

This project will strengthen our efforts to start up cleaning of the Eastern European Caucasus and Central Asian (EECCA) countries and establish a platform for the other countries to join and extend the activities.

With the increasing number of partners, the national governments and regional governments and NGOs in the countries that own obsolete pesticides, EU Commission, EU Parliament and international organizations FAO, Secretariats of Basel and Stockholm Convention, UNDP, UNEP, UNIDO, World Bank and with your support we will be able to fulfil our mission free the world of obsolete pesticides.

One can find obsolete pesticides mainly in three forms:

1.  Stocks in and around former storages or their remains with relative small amounts varying from several kg’s to tens or hundreds of tonnes (in exceptional cases up to thousand tonnes at individual locations). Distribution at at least tens of thousands of locations. Often this goes along with large amounts of empty packages and containers, contaminated sprayers, contaminated building materials and contaminated soils around the storage sites;

2.  Stocks that are collection points in the former Soviet Union area, the so-called Polygons or burial sites. These are special landfills designed for the controlled storage of outdated pesticides and other hazardous waste. The landfills were commonly fenced and guarded and all amounts have been accurately registered. However with the collapse of the Soviet Union’s central control system, Polygons were abandoned, fences were torn down, and pesticides were illegally excavated, repackaged and sold onto local market or exported by organized crime. Polygons – in the sheer nature of the concept – comprise a limited number of very large sites, often in combination with other hazardous waste.

3.  Waste originating from the production of pesticides; the main component is HCH (hexachlorocyclohexane) waste stemming from production of Lindane. HCH waste is distributed on a limited number of sites, however with large amounts of waste varying from several tens of thousand to sometimes more than hundred(s) thousand tonnes.

One can find obsolete pesticides mainly in three forms:

1.  Stocks in and around former storages or their remains with relative small amounts varying from several kg’s to tens or hundreds of tonnes (in exceptional cases up to thousand tonnes at individual locations). Distribution at at least tens of thousands of locations. Often this goes along with large amounts of empty packages and containers, contaminated sprayers, contaminated building materials and contaminated soils around the storage sites;

2.  Stocks that are collection points in the former Soviet Union area, the so-called Polygons or burial sites. These are special landfills designed for the controlled storage of outdated pesticides and other hazardous waste. The landfills were commonly fenced and guarded and all amounts have been accurately registered. However with the collapse of the Soviet Union’s central control system, Polygons were abandoned, fences were torn down, and pesticides were illegally excavated, repackaged and sold onto local market or exported by organized crime. Polygons – in the sheer nature of the concept – comprise a limited number of very large sites, often in combination with other hazardous waste.

3.  Waste originating from the production of pesticides; the main component is HCH (hexachlorocyclohexane) waste stemming from production of Lindane. HCH waste is distributed on a limited number of sites, however with large amounts of waste varying from several tens of thousand to sometimes more than hundred(s) thousand tonnes.

Obsolete pesticides can only be solved if the parties involved are going through a number of vital steps. These steps are:

  1. Awareness process of all stakeholders, so that the dangers are well understood and the willingness is created that all stakeholders contribute to its solution. It is also vital that local and national politicians will work jointly to include the issue as priority on the local and national environmental action programmes
  2. Public participation. In a number of countries, public participation has successfully been applied as it is the core for citizens to “help yourself” and join forces to deal with the issue
  3. Training on the solution of obsolete pesticides. The training is based on the Trainer of the Trainer concept, where regional or per country trainers will be built up in order to continue the training of others, so that enough local capacity is built up to deal with the problem. Training consist of a number of FAO modules that have been successfully proven through the years and deal with inventories, risk assessment, repackaging and safeguarding, remediation, destruction and management, prevention of future stocks and reduction of present stocks
  4. Good technical information. Make available neutral and detailed information on the available destruction technologies (see SBC Fact Sheets IHPA library)
  5. Create partnerships. Join forces to get more donors involved and create the necessary partnerships so that co-funding  between owners, local and national authorities and interested bilateral and international donors will be secured
  6. Control of all works. During clean-up monitor and control the execution of repackaging works, transport and final destruction
  7. Contribute to sustainable agriculture. Stimulate integrated Pest Management and work on Empty container programmes