NAEM is a professional association that empowers corporate leaders to advance environmental stewardship, create safe and healthy workplaces, and promote global sustainability. As the largest network for Environmental, Health and Safety, and Sustainability decision-makers, we provide peer-led educational conferences and an active community for sharing solutions to today`s corporate EHS and Sustainability management challenges.

Company details

1612 K Street, NW, Suite 1102 , Washington , District of Columbia 20006 USA

Locations Served

Members

Business Type:
Professional association
Industry Type:
Health and Safety - Health and Safety Regulations and Compliance
Market Focus:
Nationally (across the country)
Year Founded:
1990

NAEM is a professional association that empowers corporate leaders to advance environmental stewardship, create safe and healthy workplaces, and promote global sustainability. As the largest network for Environmental, Health and Safety, and Sustainability decision-makers, we provide peer-led educational conferences and an active community for sharing solutions to today's corporate EHS and Sustainability management challenges.

NAEM is a professional association that empowers corporate leaders to advance environmental stewardship, create safe and healthy workplaces, and promote global sustainability. We provide peer-led educational conferences, benchmarking research and an active community for sharing solutions to today's corporate EHS and sustainability management challenges. If you want to network with EHS leaders and learn about the latest trends in corporate EHS management, we encourage you to get involved today.

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We are the leader in improving the business acumen, leadership skills and professional effectiveness of EHS and Sustainability professionals through:

  • Peer-led educational programming
  • Exclusive benchmarking research
  • Decision-making tools
  • Private online community
  • Network of engaged professionals

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NAEM is the largest professional community for corporate environmental, health and safety, and sustainability decision-makers. Our membership is composed of mid-level and senior environmental management leaders from more than 800 national and multi-national companies, including the majority of the Fortune 500. If you’re interested in getting involved, you can join as either an individual or corporate member or sign up to receive our newsletter.

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NAEM was founded in 1990 by a small group of environmental management professionals who were looking for a way to exchange ideas and learn from one another.

In the early 1990s they began meeting to share their stories and hear their peers’ best practices for preventing pollution, complying with environmental regulations, and advocating for change within their companies.

What started as a small group of dedicated practitioners has grown into the largest professional community of corporate environmental, health and safety, and sustainability decision-makers.

Our peer-driven educational programs deliver insight into the latest trends and and the tools practitioners need to add business value through EHS.

  • NAEM offered one of the first conferences on how to implement a sustainability program.
  • In 1999, NAEM introduced corporate leaders to John Elkington’s ground-breaking concept of the 'triple bottom line'.
  • Last year, NAEM invited Peter Senge, the revolutionary business strategist and author of 'The Necessary Revolution,' to address our community as a keynote speaker at our annual conference.

In our 20th year, NAEM is introducing a new website where practitioners can share information and network in a private, online setting. As always, we continue to equip our members with the tools they need to continuously improve their programs, develop professionally, and move the EHS profession forward.

Companies that aspire to be better environmental stewards invest in strong environmental, health and safety management, otherwise known as EHS. From an environmental standpoint, it involves creating a systematic approach to managing waste, complying with environmental regulations, or reducing the company’s carbon footprint. Successful EHS programs also include measures to address ergonomics, air quality, and other aspects of workplace safety that could affect the health and well-being of employees.

What does an Environmental, Health and Safety (EHS) manager do?

Management-level environmental, health and safety, and sustainability leaders are the environmental stewards of the corporate world, working behind the scenes at many of the country's largest companies to comply with regulations, advocate for progressive environmental policies, and protect workers' safety.

Engineers or scientists by training, EHS Managers bring a highly specialized skill set to their work, marrying technical expertise with management skills to translate corporate policy into practice.

How does EHS relate to sustainability?

With the advent of sustainability, our members’ skills and experience are more important than ever. EHS leaders are increasingly responsible for designing and implementing strategies to take companies beyond compliance.

These initiatives involve tasks such as:

  • Developing and leading a formal sustainability program
  • Creating successful internal partnerships to integrate EHS values and practices across the business
  • Communicating enterprise risks associated with environmental, health, or safety failures
  • Establishing global corporate EHS standards and practices
  • Publicly reporting progress on a full spectrum of EHS and sustainability initiatives
  • Responding to stakeholder inquires about their company’s EHS and sustainability performance
  • Working with supply chain
  • Global auditing
  • Ensuring safe and healthy workplaces around the world
What is the history of the EHS profession?

The corporate EHS function, which oversees environmental, health and safety compliance began to merge at the management level around 1990.

The first area is environmental management, which emerged as a profession in the 1970s, following the creation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and other state-level regulatory systems. As companies began limiting waste to prevent pollution, they needed engineers to adapt scrubbers, filters, and other process changes to existing manufacturing systems. Workplace safety and occupational health also grew in importance during this time, with the passage of legislation such as the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970.

Over time, companies developed systematic way of complying with environmental, health and safety regulations. Corporations began tracking key measures and looking for ways to improve their performance. Then, in the 1990s, improvements in data technology management made it easier for an organization to analyze its operations. Around that time, corporations began to merge oversight for environmental, health and safety programs through a new management role called EHS. The newly appointed leaders, who began their careers in one of the three sub-disciplines, started to create systems to drive EHS progress across all operations.

Today, with the advent of sustainability, EHS professionals are leading corporate efforts toward sustainability. Building on their decades of experience, EHS leaders are striving to meet this challenge, creating systems to reduce energy use, conserve water, and better communicate with stakeholders. Indeed, a 2009 NAEM survey found that two-thirds of the sustainability initiatives at member companies are being led or managed by the EHS function.