Plankton Monitoring News

  • Marine species richness is not highest at equator

    New research indicates that zones closest to the equator have less species diversity than previously thought. A research team from the University of Auckland has reviewed 27 previously published studies and used the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS) to mine data on 65,000 marine species. The team, including doctoral candidate Chhaya Chaudhary, researcher Dr Hanieh Saeedi and Associate ...


    By PaR Systems, Inc.

  • Jenfitch, LLC Announces JC 9450 ROS kills Listeria in less than 10 seconds

    Jenfitch, LLC recently completed a study with the UC Davis Post Harvest Dept using JC 9450 ROS as a reagent in rinse water containing a heavy organic loading.  They found that controlling the ORP above +700 mV, they observed a 6 log reduction in Listeria Monocytogene and Salmonella. JC 9450 ROS is a new generation of disinfectant developed for the 21st ...


    By Jenfitch, LLC

  • New method for detecting microplastic particles in fish stomachs

    A novel approach for identifying and isolating anthropogenic – including microplastic – particles in fish stomachs has been devised by researchers in Belgium. The new method may enable scientists and policymakers to better assess the presence, quantity and composition of particles ingested by marine life, and improve understanding of the environmental effects of marine plastic ...

  • Plastic pellets everywhere, and diving robot sensors

    The Dr Fridtjof Nansen is plying the waves of the southern Indian Ocean, trawling for trash. Every time the ship's scientific crew threw down special nets, they hauled in pieces of plastics, underscoring the risk of dramatic upheavals in marine ecosystems even in one of the world's least-known and least-visited environments. An estimated 5 trillion ...

  • Plastic found in stomachs of over 1 in 6 large pelagic fish sampled in Mediterranean Sea

    Plastic pollution in the ocean is a growing problem. This study, which is the first to investigate the presence of plastic debris in large pelagic fish in the central Mediterranean Sea, found that over 18% of fish had ingested plastics. Marine litter, defined by the European Commission as any persistent manufactured or processed solid material discarded, disposed of or abandoned in the marine ...

  • Growth of algae affected by ocean acidification and nutrient pollution

    Ocean acidification and eutrophication may affect the growth of microscopic algae — phytoplankton — with knock-on impacts for marine food chains and fisheries, warns a new study. By growing phytoplankton under different scenarios the researchers found that phytoplankton species are affected differently according to the acidity and nutrient content of the water. Ocean acidification is ...

  • Ocean warming speeds up cycle of climate change

    The warming oceans could start to return more carbon dioxide to the atmosphere as the planet warms, according to new research. And since 70% of the planet is covered by clear blue water, anything that reduces the oceans’ capacity to soak up and sequester carbon could only make climate change more certain and more swift. It is a process that engineers ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Geoengineering could worsen climate change

    Geoengineering – which sometimes seems to be the despairing climate scientist’s Plan B – simply won’t work. It won’t offer a quick fix to the planet’s burden of global warming, and it will be difficult to convince anybody that it could work at all. Geoengineering is any deliberate, large-scale intervention in the workings of the climate machine ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Iron’s mixed blessing for health of oceans

    Technology’s answer to climate change in a world in which humans go on releasing carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has just had another setback. The idea of fertilising the planet’s oceans with iron filings to stimulate green growth and turn the oceans into a carbon sink isn’t so simple as hoped. Two studies – both involving experiments at sea – have ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Ocean pH value decreasing

    A research project into ocean acidification has increased knowledge about conditions in the Baltic Sea and Kattegat-Skagerrak. When the pH value falls, the whole marine ecosystem is affected. A newly developed measurement technique provides information about natural variations in the oceans, which results in improved environmental monitoring. Since 1850 the pH value of the world’s ...

  • Chelsea’s expert on active fluorescence techniques presents at Challenger Conference for Marine Science - University of East Anglia (3-5 Sept 12)

    Chelsea Technologies Group will once again be exhibiting and presenting at the Challenger Society for Marine Science Conference & Mini-Expo at the University of East Anglia, 3-5th September. Veronica Chan, one of Chelsea’s experts on active fluorescence techniques, will be presenting a paper entitled "How recent technological advances have enhanced and extended the applications for ...


    By Chelsea Technologies Group

  • UPDATE: Burns & McDonnell Assisting Cities as Zebra Mussels Threaten Public Water Systems

    Cities across the Midwest are on alert after zebra mussels nearly halted one city's water intake system and continue to threaten other public supplies and waterways. "Some utilities are being overwhelmed," says John Mitchell, director of the water practice at Burns & McDonnell. "Planning for the inevitable invasion of these mollusks is critical. Almost every surface water supply in the ...


    By Burns & McDonnell

  • Observing arctic ice-edge plankton blooms from space

    Ongoing climate-driven changes to the Arctic sea-ice could have a significant impact on the blooming of tiny planktonic plants (phytoplankton) with important implications for the Arctic ecosystem, according to new research conducted by scientists at the UK\'s National Oceanography Centre (NOC). Advances in modern satellite technology offer the opportunity to observe and monitor ice-edge blooms at ...

  • CO2-chomping microbes battling for ocean iron

    Research published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science explores the relationship between iron, which limits primary productivity in vast regions of the ocean, and its uptake by phytoplankton species. It has identified how natural organic compounds in the Southern Ocean can control iron availability to phytoplankton in iron-deficient waters and, in particular, for ...

  • Alien invaders threaten world Heritage Site

    Alien wildlife species are multiplying around Europe's Wadden Sea, posing a serious threat to biodiversity. The warning came in a new report launched on Wadden Sea Day - a platform for recent research on the marine World Heritage Site that borders the Netherlands, Germany and Denmark. As well as reducing biodiversity, the abundant alien species could also prove an economic burden to the Wadden ...

  • EPA christens new great lakes research vessel (IL, IN, MI, MN, NY, OH, PA, WI)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Assistant Administrator for Research and Development, Paul Anastas today joins Congressman Jim Oberstar, D-Chisholm in the christening of the Lake Explorer II, a new vessel to support EPA research in the Great Lakes Area. The vessel is being commissioned as the RV Lake Explorer II to support EPA research in the Great Lakes—a vast region with over ...

  • Green machine: a new push for pond scum power

    Just the basic facts make you wonder why algae aren"t powering our civilisation already. The single-celled phytoplankton produce half our planet"s oxygen and are the fastest-growing green organisms known. In shallow seawater ponds on land, they can use sunlight and sewage to turn concentrated carbon dioxide - flue gas from coal burning, say - into usable hydrocarbons, half of which can almost be ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • American public health champion receives 2010 Stockholm water prize

    Dr. Rita Colwell, distinguished Professor from the University of Maryland and John Hopkins University’s Bloomberg School of Public Health in the United States, has been named the 2010 Stockholm Water Prize Laureate. Dr. Colwell’s pioneering research on the prevention of waterborne infectious diseases has helped protect the health and lives of millions. Dr. Colwell, 76, is widely recognized as ...

  • Hitachi Ballast Water Purification System, a Coagulation and Magnetic-Separation Solution, Receives First Formal Approval from Japanese Government

    Tokyo, Mar 17, 2010 - (JCN Newswire) - Hitachi Plant Technologies, Ltd. and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. were granted on March 5, 2010, the first formal approval by the Japanese government for their jointly-developed Hitachi Ballast Water Purification System (ClearBallast)(1). Formal approval was based on the Procedure for Approval of Ballast Water Management Systems (G8), which is in ...


    By Japan Corporate News - JCN

  • Aquatic Bacteria: Possible markers for monitoring arctic climate change

    The study, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition, shows that bacterial communities in the six rivers shifted synchronously over time, correlating with seasonal shifts in hydrology and biogeochemistry. The research team documents these patterns through a three-year, circumpolar study of planktonic bacterial communities in the six largest rivers of ...


    By ScienceDaily

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