Snow Monitoring News

  • Discover the NEW Lufft WS100 Radar Precipitation Sensor

    The Lufft WS100 is our precipitation sensor based on radar technology and with adjustable heating. It measures the speed of all forms of condensed water. These include rain, freezing rain, hail, snow and sleet. The low-energy sensor detects precipitation from the first drops. It measures the precipitation intensity of up to 200 mm/h and detects drops with a size of up to 5.0 ...

  • Discover the NEW LUFFT WS100

    Fast, safe & maintenance-free: The WS100 radar precipitation sensor in use  The Lufft WS100 is our maintenance-free radar precipitation sensor for meteorological monitoring. The only one of its kind - it recognizes the type and amount of precipitation from the first drop, and is preferred for remote locations. ...

  • Every second counts: the maintenance free WS100 precipitation sensor

    Especially in the cold and wet season, it is vital that operational decisions can be made and implemented within a few seconds. This is especially true for meteorological data evaluations for aviation and road traffic. With the WS100, sensor manufacturer Lufft developed a radar precipitation sensor detecting precipitation types and intensities quickly, reliably and maintenance-free with a ...

  • New Generation of laser-based Snow Depth Detection

    Weather services, airports, road maintenance depot, ski resort managers as well as electricity producers can look forward to the new snow depth sensor SHM31 from Lufft. The new sensor is an advancement of the proven SHM 30 which was developed by Jenoptik in mid-2009 and incorporated into the Lufft range of optical sensors in mid-2014. It quickly detects snow depths up to 15 meters. ...

  • The Arctic: a hotspot for marine litter

    From 31 May to 7 June, Wageningen Economic Research investigated the litter that had washed up on remote beaches in the Arctic. The most commonly found items were pieces of plastic, fishing nets and rope. Having information about the sources of this litter is crucial if we are to develop effective measures that tackle the problem at the source. On Jan Mayen, the most remote island in the ...

  • Lufft introduces laser-based snow depth sensor SHM31

    Some new features of the Lufft SHM31 snow depth sensor include, in particular, the different communication interfaces, which make the sensor fully compatible with Lufft's UMB standards. In addition, the sensor has an integrated window heater for the entry and exit points for the laser beam, as well as an in-built protractor for simple assembly.  The sensor is fitted with the RS232, RD485 ...

  • Webinar invitation: Latest technology in Snow Depth Detection - Register now!

    You are invited to our webinar about the first introduction of our new laser-based snow depth sensor Lufft SHM31 with explanation of the measurement principle and the main advantages out of it. Don't miss! DATE: Thu, May 18, 2017 l TIME: 04:00 PM (CEST) This webinar is free for ...

  • Biral Sensors used in Antarctic Climate-Change Research

    Sensors from meteorological specialists, Biral, are currently being used in Antarctic Climate-Change Research mission, headed by a French research group. The APRES3 campaign is a long term project with the aim of measuring precipitation in Antarctica, as well as monitoring climate change to understand the effect APRES3, ...

  • EON2 CS2 The Last Goes and GPS Antenna You`ll Ever Need

    The EON2 Antenna requires no assembly, and no aiming in most locations. Rugged by design, it is completely sealed for marine environments and dome-shaped for superior ice/snow shedding. Furthermore, it’s smaller, lighter and more durable than a Yagi. With over 1,000 EON2 Antennas in operation worldwide, it is the de facto standard for many agencies, including Canadian ...


    By FTS

  • HORIBA Jobin Yvon Gratings in Sentinel-3A satellite helps monitor land and sea

    The Sentinel-3A satellite was launched on February 16th, 2016 from Russia to its sun-synchronous orbit more than 800kms above to monitor the health of our earth’s land and oceans. Five instruments have been integrated on board, including the Ocean and Land Colour Instrument (OLCI), a spectrometer based on a custom HORIBA Jobin Yvon (HJY) concave ...


    By HORIBA Europe GmbH

  • Explaining extreme events from a climate perspective

    Human activities, such as greenhouse gas emissions and land use, influenced specific extreme weather and climate events in 2014, including tropical cyclones in the central Pacific, heavy rainfall in Europe, drought in East Africa, and stifling heat waves in Australia, Asia, and South America, according to a new report released today. The report, “ ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Columbia Weather adds Snow Level just in time for winter weather monitoring

    Just in time for winter preparations, Columbia Weather Systems has added a Snow Level Sensor to the sensor options for the proprietary Weather MicroServer. This feature has been added by customer request and can be used with any CWS model weather station. The sensor is installed with an Orion Weather ...

  • Paul O’Gorman: Extreme storm tracker

    Original story at MIT News Several winters back, while shoveling out his driveway after a particularly heavy snowstorm, Paul O’Gorman couldn’t help but wonder: How is climate change affecting the Boston region’s biggest snow events? The question wasn’t an idle one for O’Gorman: For the past ...

  • Call for climate sensors to gauge mountain warming risk

    Developing countries with mountainous areas need to improve their monitoring of local climate change and its impact on drinking water sources, a report warns. The ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Global warming brings more snow to Antarctica

    Although it sounds paradoxical, rising temperatures might result in more snowfall in Antarctica. Each degree of regional warming could increase snowfall on the ice continent by about 5 percent, an international team of scientists led by the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research now quantified. Published in the journal Nature Climate Change, their work builds on high-quality ice-core data ...

  • Baltic Sea faces a tough future

    The Baltic Sea is likely to be warmer, lower in oxygen and more acidic in the future, warn Swedish scientists in a recent study. Current strategies for managing the Sea will need to change if they are to meet marine protection objectives. Serious environmental problems are already clear in the Baltic Sea: pollution, overfishing and eutrophication are some well-known issues. According to the ...

  • Weather Data on Your Website

    Many users would like to add weather conditions to their website. Good news! Dyacon weather stations, and several others, automatically upload to WeatherUnderground.com. There’s no need to call the web developer and launch into weeks’ worth of work. Instead, Weather Underground has some great “sticker” options, where you can just copy and paste a little code ...


    By Dyacon, Inc.

  • Climate data shows clear signs of warming

    However you view the evidence, whatever set of measurements you examine, the picture that emerges is consistent: the Earth is heating up. The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) reports: “In 2013, the vast majority of worldwide climate indicators − greenhouse gases, sea levels, global temperatures, etc − continued to reflect trends of a warmer ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Lufft takes over product segment of Jenoptik subsidiary ESW

    Backdated to first of April, the measurement technology company Lufft were able to assume the ceilometer product range from Jenoptik and secured the exclusive worldwide distribution of the Jenoptik snow altimeter. “The completed product acquisition is an important milestone for LUFFT’s meteorological product portfolio to provide our customers with an expanded Lufft sensor technology ...

  • Industrial pollutant melted European glaciers

    Industrial emissions of black carbon were responsible for the retreat of the glaciers in the European Alps that marked the end of the so-called ‘Little Ice Age’, according to a new study. The researchers explain how black carbon deposits could have caused glaciers to melt more rapidly from the mid-19th century and suggest that human activities were already having a visible influence ...

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