algae bloom News

  • LG Sound integrates new technology to detect toxic algae blooms

    LG Sound introduces satellite remote sensing technology in order to detect toxic algae blooms. Satellite remote sensing allows water quality detection from a distance, with information obtained from satellites. Together with several European universities we discovered that different types of algae require different type of ultrasonic treatment. Therefore it is important to detect the type of ...


    By LG Sonic

  • Ohio River`s huge algae bloom a warning for water suppliers

    A toxic algae outbreak that snaked more than 600 miles down the Ohio River past four states is forcing water utilities to reassess the threat from harmful algal blooms that are popping up increasingly around the nation. Treatment plant operators and researchers along the river were surprised by the large bloom and said it should be a warning to cities that get their water supply from lakes, ...


    By Associated Press

  • Toxic algae blooming in warm water from California to Alaska

    A vast bloom of toxic algae off the West Coast is denser, more widespread and deeper than scientists feared even weeks ago, according to surveyors aboard a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research vessel. This coastal ribbon of microscopic algae, up to 40 miles wide and 650 feet deep in places, is flourishing amid unusually warm Pacific Ocean temperatures. It now stretches from at ...


    By Associated Press

  • Algal bloom in baltic sea

    This Envisat image, with courtesy of ESA, captures blue-green algae blooms filling the Baltic Sea, which is roughly 1,600km long, 190km wide and has a surface area of about 377,000 sq km. "Algae bloom" is the term used to describe the rapid multiplying of phytoplankton, microscopic marine plants that drift on or near the surface of the sea. Floating freely in the water, phytoplankton are ...

  • Cyanotoxins Guide Targets Blooming Issue

    The American Water Works Association and the Water Research Foundation today released a guide to help water utility managers detect and control cyanotoxins, the algae-related contaminants that led to a “do not drink” advisory for 400,000 people in Toledo, Ohio, last summer. “A Water Utility Manager’s Guide to Cyanotoxins” addresses cyanotoxin occurrence, ...

  • LimnoTech Featured in Lake Erie Algae Bloom Monitoring Network Article (March 2015

    LimnoTech and Project Engineer Ed Verhamme were featured recently in an article in the Environmental Monitor. The article describes the water quality monitoring network in Lake Erie that LimnoTech helped to establish last summer in response to harmful algal blooms that affected water quality in the City of Toledo, and how the network helped water treatment plant operators ...


    By LimnoTech Inc.

  • Revolutionary drone system to control, monitor and treat green algae blooms with the innovative DRONIC system

    As air drones already exist, a new development has evolved in drone technology, a water-based drone to ensure fast and efficient algae control and treatment. Combatting algae is known as a complicated process which requires accurate measurements. A European consortium would like to present the dronic project, which will change algae treatment into a new technology that can simplify and bring it ...


    By LG Sonic

  • EPA awards $300,000 small business grant for Berkeley, Calif. entrepreneur’s portable test for toxic algae blooms

    Today, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency announced a $300,000 Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant to HJ Science & Technology, Inc. in Berkeley, Calif. to build a portable instrument to analyze cyanotoxins in surface waters to help protect people from potentially harmful toxic algal blooms in lakes and rivers. “Supporting the growth of environmental small businesses in ...

  • Is iron from soil a factor in algal blooms?

    Australia's own distinctive red soils could play a part in the formation of the stinking swathes of blue-green algae often shovelled off east coast beaches in summer. A QUT team of scientists is taking an in-depth look at how iron, which gives our iron-rich soil its red colour, reaches water to potentially contribute to the algal blooms, which not only have a foul smell, but also make our eyes ...


    By ScienceDaily

  • Link found between ‘algal blooms’ and liver disease

    Cyanobacteria — often referred to as blue-green algae — are found in water bodies around the world and can produce toxins with potential health risks. This US-wide study found a significant positive association between cyanobacterial bloom coverage and death by non-alcoholic liver disease. The researchers say their study suggests some evidence of a potential health risk and should be ...

  • Eutrophication affects diversity of algae

    Eutrophication of the seas may have an impact on genetic variation in algae, research at the University of Gothenburg shows. Phytoplankton provide the basis for the whole marine food chain. These microscopic organisms are common in coastal areas, all the way from the polar regions to the Equator, and multiply through cell division. If cells are present in the water mass in large numbers an algal ...


    By ScienceDaily

  • Airborne lidar catches algae

    ESRL’s Jim Churnside (Chemical Sciences Division) has used lidar instruments on airplanes to find schools of fish and squid. He’s used lidar—which bounces laser light off distant objects and captures the information-rich return signals—to find abandoned “ghost nets,” which can ensnare and kill ocean dwellers. Now, Churnside is using airborne lidar to find layers of phytoplankton—tiny plant-like ...

  • Oceanographers discover toxic algae

    Louisiana State University, USA, researchers Sibel Bargu and Ana Garcia (Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences) have discovered toxic algae in vast, remote regions of the open ocean for the first time. The recent findings are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are reported as increasing both geographically and in ...

  • Is Algae the new green?

    Algae, one of the most abundant and easily cultured organisms on the planet, has a versatile range of uses in the environmental sector. From treating wastewater to providing bio-fuels, this simple organism may be the answer to several environmental problems. Algae are a large and diverse group of simple photosynthetic organisms with approximately 65,000 different species around the ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • EPA Planning to Issue Health Advisories On Harmful Algal Blooms by May 2015

    The Environmental Protection Agency is aiming to issue by May 2015 drinking water health advisories for cyanobacteria, the harmful forms of blue-green algae that contaminated water supplies in Toledo, Ohio, and resulted in a weekend-long ban in early August, an agency official said Sept. 29. The agency is working on health advisories for microcystin L-R and cylindrospermopsin, with plans to have ...


    By Bloomberg BNA

  • China tackles algae in Olympic venue

    More than 10,000 Chinese soldiers and civilians have been sent in to clear up a giant algal bloom threatening this summer's Olympic sailing events. The algae, first spotted in late May, has choked large stretches of coast around the Eastern city of Qingdao, according to local media. Workers are now heading out to sea every day to collect thousands of tonnes of algae around the city, which will ...

  • Air pollution modelling could help predict algal blooms

    Models that predict how nitrogen from the air is deposited in the sea could be useful in predicting algal blooms. Based on the knowledge that excess nitrogen increases algal growth rates, researchers simulated nitrogen deposition in the North Sea and suggested that, using predicted weather data, it might be possible to adapt this approach to predict algal blooms. Algae populations are kept under ...

  • Harmful algal blooms in Europe will increase under climate change

    Harmful algal blooms may become more common in north western European waters as a result of climate change, according to a new study. The researchers predicted that by the end of this century blooms of two groups of algal species will occur over larger areas and for longer periods every year. Algal blooms occur naturally at certain times of year when these microscopic plants multiply rapidly. ...

  • Harmful algal blooms in Europe will increase under climate change

    Harmful algal blooms may become more common in north western European waters as a result of climate change, according to a new study. The researchers predicted that by the end of this century blooms of two groups of algal species will occur over larger areas and for longer periods every year. Algal blooms occur naturally at certain times of year when these microscopic plants multiply rapidly. ...

  • Remote, underwater detection of harmful algae

    This achievement represents a significant milestone in NOAA's effort to monitor the type and toxicity of harmful algal blooms (HABs). HABs are considered to be increasing not only in their global distribution, but also in the frequency, duration, and severity of their effects. HABs damage coastal ecosystem health and pose threats to humans as well as marine life. Climate change is expected to ...

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