aquatic biodiversity News

  • UBC opens beaty biodiversity centre

    The University of British Columbia today officially opened the Beaty Biodiversity Centre, new home to some of the world"s top biodiversity researchers and Canada"s largest blue whale skeleton exhibit. The centre houses the Biodiversity Research Centre, which has brought 25 principal investigators and their teams under one roof, and the Beaty Biodiversity Museum, with more than two million ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Biodiversity may clean up water

    Conserving biodiversity could help shield waterways against nitrogen pollution, says a study that showed how streams with more species are better at removing excess nutrients from water. The findings imply that developing countries that keep rivers and lakes species-rich could save money on ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Climate change affects biodiversity in inland waters

    There has so far been rather little research on the impacts of climate change on biodiversity in inland waters. The best studied group has so far been fishes. A group of scientists at the Finnish Environment Institute has now published in the internationally esteemed series Biological Reviews a study on the consequences of climate changes for various inland water organisms. In a warming climate, ...

  • Best ballast systems identified for safeguarding biodiversity

    Ballast water used on ships is a significant source of marine pollution, with a considerable impact on marine ecosystems. A number of proven technologies to limit this pollution are available. Recent research has compared these systems and ranked them according to their costs and benefits. Ballast water helps to keep ships stable and is usually loaded onto ships in port and then discharged in a ...

  • Improving the connections between Biodiversity, Water and Wetlands at the CBD Conference

    The United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) conference in Hyderabad, India 8 - 19 October is an important opportunity to improve the linkages between wetlands and water management. On 9 October (13:15 in Room 1.02, Level 1) Wetlands International is hosting an event ‘Wetlands, Water and Aichi Targets’ which will identify ...


    By Wetlands International

  • New tool developed to highlight and help prevent declines in freshwater biodiversity

    Biodiversity is declining in freshwater ecosystems across the globe, a new study has shown. The researchers created a mathematical model, called GLOBIOaquatic, which builds a picture of the threats to the biodiversity of rivers, lakes and wetlands that are posed by a variety of human activities. The most crucial of these are land-use changes, nutrient and chemical pollution, and disturbances to ...

  • Fiji Joins convention on migratory species to support country`s rich biodiversity

    From the giant humpback whale, to the delicate Ruddy Turnstone bird, a host of migratory species - several of which are endangered or threatened species - are set to gain additional support, following the decision of the Republic of Fiji to join the UN-led Convention on Migratory Species (CMS). Fiji - one of the most developed economies in the Pacific region - becomes the 119 th Party to the ...

  • Alpine rivers hold important clues for preserving biodiversity and coping with climate change

    Marginal plants, particularly trees, play a crucial role in sustaining the biodiversity of Europe’s big river systems, according to a recently held workshop organised by the European Science Foundation (ESF). This finding provides important clues for protecting Europe’s rivers against a combined onslaught from human development and climate change, which are tampering with existing ecosystems and ...


    By European Science Foundation

  • A future for Europe`s most endangered songbird: governments adopt new action plan to protect Aquatic Warbler

    Europe"s rarest songbird, the Aquatic Warbler, will be better protected following decisions taken at a key meeting of the UN Environment Programme"s Convention on the Conservation of Migratory Species of Wild Animals (CMS). The meeting in Biebrza National Park (Poland) agreed to extend the geographical coverage of the CMS Agreement on the Aquatic Warbler (which originally comprised 15 countries) ...

  • Atkins appointed to national ecology framework

    The Environment Agency has contracted Atkins to provide expert ecological advice in freshwater ecology and conservation management across England and Wales. Atkins, the UK’s largest engineering design consultancy, has been appointed to the national Ecological Services Framework Lot 1 which relates to aquatic and terrestrial ecology. This continues its longstanding relationship with the Agency ...


    By Atkins

  • Landmark Project to Counteract Deteriorating Water Quality in Ecosystems launched at the Budapest Water Summit

    This comprehensive project will address both issues of water quality, including chemical, biological, and biodiversity aspects and issues of water quantity including availability, changes over time and morphology of bodies of water. In an attempt to improve the sustainable management of global water resources, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) in collaboration with the United ...

  • Urban waterways provide important home for wildlife

    Urbanisation plays an important role in changes to biodiversity, so it is important that towns and cities are well managed to protect wildlife. New Dutch research concludes that urban drainage systems, such as ditches and canals, can help maintain the same level of biodiversity as rural waterways. Recommendations are offered to ensure their full potential is met. Urbanisation is increasing, but ...

  • Decreasing nitrogen emissions will cause relatively fast reductions of impacts on ecosystems

    The negative effects of acidic deposition in Europe and North America on natural ecosystems have been reduced significantly over the past decades, but the impacts of nitrogen on ecosystems are still persistent. This is evident from research results presented in a recently published book written by nearly 100 experts from 15 countries, entitled ...

  • Putting the `CSI` into CSIRO on world water day

    Potentially applicable to coastal ecosystems around the world, the technique is based on a custom-made DNA microarray (gene chip), which contains DNA sequences from over 42,000 organisms found at the bottom of oceans and estuaries. A significant proportion of this genetic information was derived from samples taken around Sydney Harbour. Using the chip, scientists can investigate how many and what ...

  • Slovenia: A green leader of the European Union

    Slovenia has signed the Countdown 2010 Declaration to halt the rate of biodiversity loss by 2010. Ministers Janez Podobnik and Iztok Jarc plan to use sustainable forest management as the key to this commitment With nearly 60% forested area, Slovenia recognized the value of forests as a natural resource, not only in terms of wood production, but also for their ecological functions and ...

  • Zoology, ecology and botany 2008 impact factors

    Oceanography and Marine Biology retained top position in Oceanography and is second ranked in Marine & Freshwater Biology. Biofouling, following a 36% increase to 3.707, occupies 3rd place in the same category. Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences rises to 7/155 in Plant Sciences with an Impact Factor of 6.206.Other T&F journals saw robust improvement in the latest Journal Citation ...


    By Taylor & Francis Group

  • Forest Service and EPA Increase Coordination to Improve Water Quality

    The U.S. Forest Service and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have agreed on new steps designed to improve water quality on National Forests and Grasslands.  On Friday, September 28, Forest Service Chief  Abigail Kimbell and EPA Assistant Administrator for Water Benjamin Grumbles signed today a Memorandum of Agreement that enables both agencies to increase coordinated ...

  • Guidelines for restoring ecosystems: when, where and how?

    Chemical contamination impairs ecosystem function and reduces biodiversity. Restoration of contaminated ecosystems is important to re-establish the ecosystem services on which society depends. This study provides recommendations to maximise the success of restoration projects by considering when, where and how contaminated sites should be restored. In 2013, the EU produced 322 million tonnes of ...

  • Female fish swap sex in polluted, low-oxygen water

    Hypoxia – low levels of dissolved oxygen – can cause genetically female fish to develop into males, new research has found. Hypoxia in aquatic environments is often the result of eutrophication, which is caused by pollution from human activities. The findings suggest that hypoxia could cause fish populations to collapse, with consequences for entire ecosystems. There are more ...

  • What are the impacts of invasive alien species?

    The impacts of invasive alien species (IAS) can take many different forms, from ecological to socio-economic. A new review investigates how to define and quantify ‘impact’ and discusses the most successful strategies to reduce invasion risk and prevent different impacts. Biological invasions can substantially degrade ecosystems and IAS are listed among the primary causes of global ...

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