atmospheric water harvesting News

  • Drinking recycled water?

    The Australian Government National Water Commission funded a study to establish an approach to assess the quality of water treated using managed aquifer recharge. Researchers at Australia’s CSIRO Land and Water set out to determine if the en product would meet standard drinking water guidelines. At the Parafield Aquifer Storage, Transfer and Recovery research project in South Australia, the ...

  • Getting a charge out of water droplets

    Original story at MIT News Last year, MIT researchers discovered that when water droplets spontaneously jump away from superhydrophobic surfaces during condensation, they can gain electric charge in the process. Now, the same team has demonstrated that this process can generate small amounts of electricity that might be ...

  • Melting glaciers threaten water supplies in Kyrgyzstan

    The number of glaciers in Kyrgyzstan has dropped by 15 percent over the past 30 years, according to Kyrgyz environmental experts, because of climate change. 'The process of melting glaciers is a very serious problem for Kyrgyzstan because the main water resources are connected first of all with the glaciers,' Anna Kirilenko, with the BIOM environmental NGO, told IRIN in the capital, Bishkek. ...


    By IRIN Association

  • New Jersey Waters Fall Short of State Standards

    TRENTON, New Jersey (ENS) - Many waters in New Jersey are not meeting state water quality standards for aquatic life, fish consumption and freshwater recreational uses, according to a new comprehensive report issued today. Still, most waters in the state are healthy enough to support drinking water supply, shellfish harvesting, and ocean beach recreational uses, the report concluded. ...

  • The trick to guaranteed water containment and waterproofing solutions

    The real trick to guaranteeing longterm water containment or waterproofing solutions is to invest in material that will withstand the forces of nature over a life time. A type of synthetic rubber membrane known as EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) has proven success in a number of application types by offering outstanding resistance to heat, UV rays, ozone and extreme weather conditions. ...


    By Russetts Development Ltd

  • Rare water data drives heating debate underground

    Two great bodies of water have begun to feel the heat. European scientists report that they have evidence that the planet’s groundwater – the subterranean ocean of freshwater that bubbles into wells, freshens desert springs, scours great underground limestone caverns and makes ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Water in the desert – Has an age old dream come true?

    Water is a first sign of life, and one of our most precious natural resources. But in many parts of the world it is becoming a scarcity, such as in areas of the Middle East where centuries of dry desert conditions have made water a highly valued commodity. Things may be changing, however, and the dream of turning desert sands into blooming gardens could be a step closer to reality. In Abu Dhabi, ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Water in the desert – Has an age old dream come true?

    Water is a first sign of life, and one of our most precious natural resources. But in many parts of the world it is becoming a scarcity, such as in areas of the Middle East where centuries of dry desert conditions have made water a highly valued commodity. Things may be changing, however, and the dream of turning desert sands into blooming gardens could be a step closer to reality. In Abu Dhabi, ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Toxic algae blooming in warm water from California to Alaska

    A vast bloom of toxic algae off the West Coast is denser, more widespread and deeper than scientists feared even weeks ago, according to surveyors aboard a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research vessel. This coastal ribbon of microscopic algae, up to 40 miles wide and 650 feet deep in places, is flourishing amid unusually warm Pacific Ocean temperatures. It now stretches from at ...


    By Associated Press

  • Water security and climate change: how science can help

    Policymakers need better information about the regional impact of climate change on water supplies, and on ways of adapting to it. For centuries, food production — and thus social development — has depended heavily on access to the water needed to grow crops or rear livestock. Having enough water is only part of the issue, however: it must also be available when and where it ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Singapore’s first Water Week sees deals worth over US$270m and international initiatives to boost water research and investments

    Governments, utilities providers and water companies signed 27 agreements totalling more than SGD367 million (USD270 million) during the first Singapore International Water Week, which drew to a close last Friday. In addition, a water fund was launched to attract SGD435 million (USD320 million) in investments in Asian water projects.  The global event for the water industry also saw ...


    By IWA Publishing

  • Food waste harms climate, water, land and biodiversity - new FAO report

    The waste of a staggering 1.3 billion tonnes of food per year is not only causing major economic losses but also wreaking significant harm on the natural resources that humanity relies upon to feed itself, says a new FAO report. Food Wastage Footprint: Impacts on Natural Resources is the first study to analyze the impacts of global food ...

  • Decoding the Mysteries of the Gulf Dead Zone

    AUSTIN, Texas, October 18, 2007 (ENS) - Off the coast of Louisiana and Texas this summer, an area of deep water covering 7,900 square miles in the Gulf of Mexico was declared hypoxic. This area of low oxygen water called the dead zone was about the size of the state of New Jersey. It is the third largest Gulf of Mexico dead zone on record since measurements began in 1985. The largest ...

  • Landmark US Geological Survey study demonstrates how methylmercury, known to contaminate seafood, originates in the ocean

    A new landmark study published today documents for the first time the process in which increased mercury emissions from human sources across the globe, and in particular from Asia, make their way into the North Pacific Ocean and as a result contaminate tuna and other seafood. Because much of the mercury that enters the North Pacific comes from the atmosphere, scientists have predicted an ...

  • EPA, NOAA disapprove Oregon’s coastal nonpoint pollution control program

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have disapproved the state of Oregon’s coastal nonpoint pollution control program because it does not sufficiently protect salmon streams and landslide-prone areas from logging impacts or reduce runoff from forest roads built before 1971. All coastal states that participate in the ...

  • New agriculture offset protocol expands opportunities for farmers to participate in the carbon market

    The Climate Action Reserve, North America’s premier carbon offset registry, adopted its Nitrogen Management Project Protocol today. The protocol provides opportunities for farmers to generate carbon offsets by implementing agricultural management practices that reduce the application of synthetic nitrogen fertilizer to corn crops in the Midwestern United States. Nitrogen is an essential ...


    By Climate Action Reserve

  • Cattle can help restore degraded soil

    Agriculture Research Service has tested cattle grazing on degraded soil to determine if the activity would have any effect on restoring depleted nutrients. During a 12 year period, 18 paddocks were used to monitor the soils response to different land management practices. In the end, the paddocks with medium to heavy grazing proved to be the best way to sequester nitrogen and carbon in the soil. ...

  • Global warming having direct impact on the world`s key fishing grounds

    Climate change is emerging as the latest threat to the world's dwindling fish stocks a new report by the UN Environment Programme (UNEP) suggests. At least three quarters of the globe's key fishing grounds may become seriously impacted by changes in circulation as a result of the ocean's natural pumping systems fading and falling they suggest. These natural pumps, dotted at sites across the ...

  • Science opens routes to energy recycling

    Molecular biology has been used by scientists in the US to make a catalyst that can split water into hydrogen and oxygen. It means that a truly renewable biotechnological material could be used to help cars run on water. In China, chemists have announced a nanofabric – a catalyst put together atoms at a time – that could begin the process of turning the greenhouse gas carbon ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Pall Corp. to Present Membrane-Based Separation Solutions for Alternative Fuels

    Driven by the demand for alternatives to fossil fuels and the challenge to mitigate carbon emissions, algae biomass industry executives around the world are striving to develop and commercialize large-scale algae production. A main hurdle for this is the dewatering step required by many processes after harvesting the biomass. One way to achieve efficient and complete harvest is to employ scalable ...


    By Pall Corporation

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