biogeochemistry News

  • Aquatic Bacteria: Possible markers for monitoring arctic climate change

    The study, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition, shows that bacterial communities in the six rivers shifted synchronously over time, correlating with seasonal shifts in hydrology and biogeochemistry. The research team documents these patterns through a three-year, circumpolar study of planktonic bacterial communities in the six largest rivers of ...


    By ScienceDaily

  • Registration for Mercury 2013 is now open!

    The organisers of the International Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant (Mercury 2013) have announced that online visitor registration for the conference is now available at www.mercury2013.com Mercury 2013 taking place from 28th July – 2nd August 2013 in Edinburgh, Scotland is the pre-eminent international forum for formal presentation and ...

  • Is iron from soil a factor in algal blooms?

    Australia's own distinctive red soils could play a part in the formation of the stinking swathes of blue-green algae often shovelled off east coast beaches in summer. A QUT team of scientists is taking an in-depth look at how iron, which gives our iron-rich soil its red colour, reaches water to potentially contribute to the algal blooms, which not only have a foul smell, but also make our eyes ...


    By ScienceDaily

  • International honour for NIWA scientist

    Science Centres: Coasts and Oceans NWIA scientist Cliff Law was today awarded the prestigious 2013 Hutchinson Medal, by the International Institute of Chemical Engineers.The institute is the global professional membership organisation for people with relevant experience or an interest in chemical engineering. Dr Law, a specialist in ...

  • Intensive land management leaves Europe without carbon sinks

    Of all global carbon dioxide emissions, less than half accumulate in the atmosphere where it contributes to global warming. The remainder is hidden away in oceans and terrestrial ecosystems such as forests, grasslands and peat-lands. Stimulating this 'free service' of aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems is considered one of the main, immediately available ways of reducing climate change. However, ...


    By ScienceDaily

  • NGWA offers course on advanced techniques for evaluating and quantifying natural attenuation

    The National Ground Water Association is offering a two-day course, “Advanced Techniques for Evaluating and Quantifying Natural Attenuation,” on November 5-6 in Denver, Colorado.Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has become widely accepted as a remediation alternative for solute plumes in groundwater. The use of MNA requires a sound understanding of natural attenuation mechanisms and their ...

  • Little hills have big effect on biodiversity

    New research, published today in Progress in Oceanography by scientists at the NOC and the University of Southampton, show that deep-sea hills increase the biodiversity of forams - a very important group of shelled protozoans. There are over 25 ...

  • Momentum builds for ‘Mercury 2013’

    Mercury is moving towards the top of the agenda for regulatory bodies and interest from the public domain is growing. The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) now defines mercury as “the pollutant of greatest concern”. In response to this, the organisers of the 11thInternational Conference on Mercury as a Global Pollutant (ICMGP) are finalising plans for an event that will bring ...

  • NGWA offering fering short course, “Monitored Natural Attenuation: Mechanisms, Site Characterization, Evaluation, and Monitoring,”

    The National Ground Water Association is offering the short course, “Monitored Natural Attenuation: Mechanisms, Site Characterization, Evaluation, and Monitoring,” November 3-4 in Denver, Colorado.This course provides the conceptual and technical background necessary to evaluate natural attenuation mechanisms and their interaction with source and transport processes at sites with organic and ...

  • India’s First Sediment Trap-Based Flux Studies in Southern Ocean

    In order to understand the response of the Southern Ocean as a carbon sink and its response to changing global climate conditions, a long-term flux study called “Southern Ocean Carbon Processes-SOCarP” was conceived at the National Centre For Antarctic and Ocean Research (NCAOR), India, using moored sediment traps. In early 2017, ...

  • McMaster receives $2.2-million for oil sands research

    Researchers at McMaster University have received nearly $2.2-million to examine important environmental processes in Alberta's oil sands, which could help speed up the land reclamation process for one of Canada's largest oil companies. The project team, led by Lesley Warren, a professor in the School of Geography & Earth Sciences at McMaster, was recruited by Syncrude Canada Ltd. to ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • US scientists head to Antarctica for climate research

    More than 30 scientists will embark on a research cruise this month to the Southern Ocean, which surrounds Antarctica. There they will combat cold and wind to study how gases that impact climate change move between the atmosphere and the ocean under high winds and seas. The Southern Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment, a six week cruise aboard the research vessel Ronald H. Brown, is co-sponsored by ...

  • Tenure-Track faculty position in Marine Science and Conservation

    The Division of Marine Science and Conservation, part of the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University, invites applications for a full time tenure track faculty position, based at the Duke Marine Laboratory on the North Carolina coast. We seek to recruit and retain a diverse workforce to maintain the excellence of the University, and offer students ...

  • NASA Discovers Unprecedented Blooms Of Ocean Plant Life

     Scientists have made a biological discovery in Arctic Ocean waters as dramatic and unexpected as finding a rainforest in the middle of a desert. A NASA-sponsored expedition punched through three-foot thick sea ice to find waters richer in microscopic marine plants, essential to all sea life, than any other ocean region on ...

  • EPA seeks scientist nominations for Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment peer review panel

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency invites the public to nominate qualified scientists to be considered for an external peer review panel that will evaluate EPA’s draft Bristol Bay Watershed Assessment. EPA is conducting an assessment to examine if large-scale mining development is likely to have adverse effects on salmon and resident fish populations in the Kvichak and Nushagak ...

  • Ocean-Climate Links Central to $97.7 Million Research Contract

    WASHINGTON, DC, August 23, 2007 (ENS) - 'No longer will ocean exploration and research be limited to scientists. Everyone with a connection to the web, including students, teachers, decisionmakers and the general public, will be able to have access to these undersea networks, enthused Mark Abbott today. As dean of Oregon State University's College of Oceanic and Atmospheric ...

  • Voyage to Southern Ocean to monitor greenhouse gas air-sea fluxes

    Scientists have set off from the Chilean port of Punta Arenas to spend 42 days amid the high winds and big waves of the Southern Ocean, where they will make groundbreaking measurements to explain how large amounts of climate-affecting gases move between atmosphere and sea, and vice-versa. The cruise should provide important information on factors controlling the flux of the greenhouse gas carbon ...

  • Regional climate models discussed at Lund conference

    More than 200 researchers from around the world are meeting this week in Lund to evaluate the recent development of regional climate models. These models have certainly been improved greatly in recent years; they can be refined further to provide even better support for the preparations we must make for future climate change. That climate change, very largely caused by human activities, ...

  • Syncrude provides $2.2-million for new oil sands research

    Researchers at McMaster University recently received nearly $2.2 million to examine important environmental processes in Alberta's oil sands, which could help speed up Syncrude's land reclamation process. The project team, led by Dr. Lesley Warren, a professor in the School of Geography & Earth Sciences at McMaster, was recruited by Syncrude to investigate bacterial sulphur reactions ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Long-term seawater analysis has global significance

    Since 1988, scientists from the University of Hawaii have been conducting almost monthly deep-sea research expeditions to collect water samples for subsequent laboratory analysis. Originally designed to characterize subtle long-term changes in environments that were believed to be stable, the work has revealed some surprising conclusions. For example, it has become evident that even in these ...


    By SEAL Analytical, Inc.

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