carbon dioxide flux News

  • Voyage to Southern Ocean to monitor greenhouse gas air-sea fluxes

    Scientists have set off from the Chilean port of Punta Arenas to spend 42 days amid the high winds and big waves of the Southern Ocean, where they will make groundbreaking measurements to explain how large amounts of climate-affecting gases move between atmosphere and sea, and vice-versa. The cruise should provide important information on factors controlling the flux of the greenhouse gas carbon ...

  • The mathematics of leaf decay

    A mathematical model reveals commonality within the diversity of leaf decay. Written by Jennifer Chu, MIT News Office. You can read the original story in MIT News The colorful leaves piling up in your backyard this fall can be thought of as natural stores of carbon. In the ...

  • LI-COR Releases New Eddy Covariance Processing Software

    LI-COR Biosciences introduces EddyPro Express, an open source software package that computes fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, methane, and energy using ...


    By LI-COR

  • Soil microbes hold key to climate puzzle

     Climate scientists puzzled by the traffic of carbon between soil and air may have to think more deeply about the role played by soil microbes − the planet’s smallest inhabitants. One research team has just found that soil microbes could actually lighten the colour of arid land soils, to  ...


    By Climate News Network

  • Rivers are carbon processors, not inert pipelines

    Microorganisms in rivers and streams play a crucial role in the global carbon cycle that has not previously been considered. Freshwater ecologist Dr Tom Battin, of the University of Vienna, told a COST ESF Frontiers of Science conference in October that our understanding of how rivers and streams deal with organic carbon has changed radically. Microorganisms such as bacteria and single celled ...


    By European Science Foundation

  • Global warming’s ecosystem double whammy

    Plants and soils act like sponges for atmospheric carbon dioxide, but new research finds that one abnormally warm year can suppress the amount of carbon dioxide taken up by some grassland ecosystems for up to two years. The findings, which followed an unprecedented four-year study of sealed, 12-ton containerized grassland plots at DRI is the cover story in the September 18 issue of the ...

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