microcystis News

  • Phosphorus pollution research in great lakes

    NOAA has awarded New York-based Stony Brook University USD285,895 as part of an anticipated three-year, nearly USD500,000 project to determine how different kinds of phosphorous, a nutrient required by all plants for growth, trigger toxic blooms of blue-green algae in the Great Lakes. The project will focus on the algal species Microcystis, which frequently causes massive and unsightly blooms in ...


  • Testing confirms toxic algae poisoned river and two reservoirs in US

    A California Superior Court judge has invited the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board to exercise its authority to regulate water quality to rid the Klamath River of toxic algae. The ruling by Judge Elaine Rushing comes in a lawsuit filed by Klamath Riverkeeper, the Karuk Tribe, and the Pacific Coast Federation of Fishermen's Associations, PCFFA, against the board. The groups filed ...

  • Tackling Harmful Algal Blooms

    In August 2014, an incident in Lake Erie, Ohio left almost half a million people without drinking water when the Mayor of Toledo was forced to ban city drinking water due to above-average levels of toxins found in the water supply. These toxins, called microcystins, were produced by a type of blue-green algae which occurs naturally in Lake Erie and is mostly harmless. But when toxins are ...

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