nanoparticle News

  • Cholera toxin nanoparticle detector

    A complex sugar may become one of the most effective weapons to stop the spread of cholera, a disease that has claimed thousands of lives in Haiti since the devastating earthquake last year. A technique developed by University of Central Florida scientists would allow relief workers to test water sources for contamination with the cholera toxin. In the test, the sugar dextran is coated onto iron ...

  • Predicting the inflammatory potential of nanoparticles

    New methods to screen nanoparticles for potential toxicity to humans are needed to test the growing number of engineered nanoparticles being developed. A battery of simple tests has been developed that can be used to investigate the potential of nanoparticles to cause lung inflammation and also avoids the need for animal testing. Despite the many benefits of using nanomaterials, concerns have ...

  • Nanoparticles decontaminate groundwater

    Since their invention a decade ago at Lehigh University, iron nanoparticles 1,000 times thinner than a human hair have demonstrated an unprecedented ability to clean contaminated groundwater. The palladium-coated particles have remediated more than 50 toxic waste sites in the US and other countries in 10 times faster than traditional pump-and-treat methods. Researchers at Lehigh University have ...


  • Ingested nanoparticle safety

    Ingestion of commonly encountered nanoparticles at typical environmental levels is unlikely to cause overt toxicity, according to US researchers. Nevertheless there is insufficient evidence to determine whether chronic exposures could lead to subtle alterations in intestinal immune function, protein profiles, or microbial balance. Writing in a forthcoming issue of the International Journal of ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Assessing the ecotoxicological risks of nanoparticles

    A new study highlights the need for more research aimed at understanding the effects of nanoparticles on the environment. Efforts should focus on developing more sensitive analytical methods for characterising and detecting nanoparticles, say the researchers. The study discusses engineered nanoparticles (ENPs), a diverse class of nanoscale particles that do not occur in nature, including ...

  • Environmental effects of nanoparticles and nanomaterials

    Pete and I attended the 6th International Meeting on the Environmental Effects of Nanoparticles and Nanomaterials in London last week. The meeting was organised by the Society for Experimental Biology (SEB) and the Society for Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry (SETAC). Plenary presentations were made across three days, with the first day focussing on chemistry, the second day on ...


    By WCA Environment Ltd.

  • Managing exposure to nanoparticles in the workplace

    It is estimated that approximately 2 million workers will be employed in nanotechnology industries worldwide in the next fifteen years. A new study reviews an existing framework of occupational risk management and describes possible methods for controlling exposure to nanomaterials in workplaces. The manufacture and use of nanomaterials is increasing. Although this is creating more jobs, those ...

  • Inhaled nanoparticles can enter the bloodstream

    Studies have found that populations who live in areas with polluted air, containing high levels of combustion-derived nanoparticles (fine particulate matter), are more likely to suffer from respiratory and cardiovascular diseases. This has raised concerns that nanoparticles are to blame and that engineered nanoparticles of a similar size could behave in the same way. It is important, therefore, ...

  • Air Monitors launches nanoparticle detector

    Traditional methods for measuring airborne particulate matter measure particle mass per unit air volume, usually with an upper size limit of x microns (PMx etc.). However, from a human health perspective, the particles of most interest are those that penetrate deep into the lungs. For this reason, Air Monitors has launched the Naneos Partector nanoparticle detector in the UK. The Swiss made ...


    By Air Monitors Ltd.

  • Nanoparticles and light can purify water

    Scientists have used nanotechnology to develop a more efficient way of using light to purify water — even in the dark. Light is often used as a water purifier and existing methods rely on processes stimulated by ultraviolet (UV) light. But UV accounts for just five per cent of daylight so a method using visible light — which accounts for almost half — is more desirable. Now researchers from ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • The effects of sunscreen nanoparticles on skin DNA

    A new study indicates that zinc oxide nanoparticles have the potential to cause damage to DNA in human skin cells. These nanoparticles are used as UV filters in sunscreens in many parts of the world, although their use is not yet authorised in Europe (with the exception of one Member State). During the last two years, there has been a rapid growth in the use of nanotechnology, some of which has ...

  • Adding nanoparticles `makes for friendly biofuels`

    Adding 'nanoparticles' improves the ignition of biofuels and makes them emit less toxic fumes, Indian researchers report. The findings that adding alumina nanoparticles helps biofuels and conventional fuels release fewer toxic emissions and smoke when burned in internal combustion engines were published by Ramachandran Bhagavathiammal Anand, associate professor of mechanical engineering at the ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • ReportsnReports - Global Markets for Nanocomposites, Nanoparticles, Nanoclays, and Nanotubes

    Global Markets for Nanocomposites, Nanoparticles, Nanoclays, and Nanotubes Global consumption of nanocomposites was an estimated 118,768 metric tons with a value of over $800 million in 2010. In 2011, the market should reach 138,389 metric tons and $920 million. By 2016, the market should amount to 333,043 metric tons and $2.4 billion, a five year compound annual growth rate (CAGR) ...


  • Polystyrene nanoparticles affect fish behaviour and metabolism

    Fish fed polystyrene nanoparticles are less active and show changes to their brains and metabolism, according to a study by Swedish and Danish researchers. The findings suggest that nanoparticles in the environment could have a major impact on fish and aquatic ecosystems. Nanoparticles are increasingly used in consumer products, such as cosmetics, and enter the environment via sewage systems. ...

  • Nanoparticles present in residues of waste incineration plant

    The use of nanomaterials in consumer goods is growing, as is their presence in waste. A new study is the first to follow the fate of engineered nanoparticles through the entire waste incineration chain. The results indicate current filter technology is effective in removing nanoparticles from flue gas, but that nanoparticles also bind to residues, such as fly ash and slag, which eventually end up ...

  • Silver nanoparticles could pose risk to aquatic ecosystems

    Silver nanoparticles are toxic to common bacteria at concentrations found in many aquatic environments across the globe, new research has found. Bacteria often form a key part of ecosystems and these impacts may be felt by the entire system, the researchers warn. Silver nanoparticles are between one and a hundred nanometres (nm) in size and are now used for their antimicrobial action in a wide ...

  • Nanoparticles in the home: more and smaller than previously detected

    Extremely small nanoscale particles are released by common kitchen appliances in abundant amounts, greatly outnumbering the previously detected, larger-size nanoparticles emitted by these appliances, according to new findings* by researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). So-called “ultrafine particles” (UFP) range in size from 2 to 10 nanometers. They are emitted ...

  • Escaped nanoparticles hazardous to crops, says study

    Nanoparticles that escape during the manufacture and use of consumer products would substantially reduce the growth of wheat were they to end up in soil, according to Chinese scientists. The production, use and disposal of nanomaterials from sectors such as cosmetics and electronics can lead to their release into air, water and soil. Their presence in wastewater, and their direct use in ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Nickel Nanoparticles Nominated for Listing in Report on Carcinogens

    On September 20, 2013, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) published a Federal Register notice requesting information on 20 substances, mixtures, and exposure circumstances, including nickel nanoparticles, nominated for possible review for future editions of the Report on Carcinogens (RoC). NTP seeks information ...


    By Bergeson & Campbell, P.C.

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