ocean acidification News

  • Antarctic scientists to study ocean acidification

    The effects of ocean acidification, caused by atmospheric carbon dioxide dissolving in the ocean, will be a focus of research at Antarctica's Davis station this summer. Scientist Dr Andrew Davidson says that the research project will investigate the effects of ocean acidification on Antarctic marine microbes (phytoplankton, protozoa and bacteria). 'These organisms play a vital role in the marine ...


    By Australian Government

  • New era dawns for world’s oceans via EPOCA

    Last June, the EU’s largest research consortium to combat ocean acidification was launched. The European Project on Ocean Acidification (EPOCA) combines over 100 scientists from 27 organisations in 9 countries. Its aim is to document ocean acidification and investigate its impact on biological processes. Based on this information the project can then predict its consequences for the next 100 ...

  • Global Economy to Lose Billions without Action to Stop Ocean Acidification, UN Report Warns

    An international team of thirty experts, led by UK scientists, has concluded that ocean acidification is already underway, and it is now near-inevitable that it will worsen, causing widespread impacts, mostly deleterious, on marine organisms and ecosystems, and on the goods and services they provide. A new international report "An updated synthesis of the impacts of ocean acidification on marine ...

  • Media advisory: Ocean acidification poses growing risk to marine life and food security

    New report shows effects of rising concentrations of CO2 in marine environment Carbon dioxide emissions from the burning of fossil fuels continue to affect our atmosphere, resulting in global warming and climate change. But rising levels of CO2 emissions are also changing the chemical balance of our oceans, causing them to become more acidic and posing greater risk to marine organisms. A new ...

  • New EU research to investigate ocean acidification impact on ecosystems

    Emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) through human activities have a well known impact on the Earth's climate. What is not so well known is that the absorption of this CO2 by the oceans is causing inexorable acidification of sea water. But what impact is this phenomenon having on marine organisms and ecosystems? This is a question to which researchers have few answers as yet. That is why the ...

  • A bleak future for Mediterranean coral as oceans become more acidic

    Mediterranean red coral (Corallium rubrum), already endangered due to over-harvesting, is likely to suffer still further under increasing ocean acidification as a result of rising CO2 emissions. Research has shown that under more acidic conditions the structural development of red coral skeletons is abnormal and growth rate is reduced. The world’s oceans are absorbing greater quantities of ...

  • Acidification may push already over-stressed Oceans into the red

    Rising C02 Concentrations Could Have Increasing Impacts on Key Fisheries and the Billions Depending Upon Them. The future impact of rising emissions on the health of seas and oceans may be far more wide-ranging and complex than was previously supposed, a new report released at the UN climate convention meeting in Mexico says. The study, entitled the Environmental Consequences of Ocean ...

  • Ocean pH: Then, Now, and Future

    Ocean acidification is the ongoing decrease in the pH of the Earth's oceans, caused by the uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) as water and air mix at the water’s surface. In an effort to better understand the historical evolution of ocean acidification, the Environmental Visualization Laboratory at NOAA has developed an Interactive Map that shows pH data from 1861 to present day, ...

  • Africa`s mollusc stocks at risk from ocean acidification

    Fishermen in Haiti and some African countries could lose their livelihoods as ocean acidification causes a decline in mollusc populations, a study has found. Human industrial activities release carbon dioxide, which dissolves in sea water, increasing its acidity. This higher acidity damages the mollusc stocks on which many fishermen in Gambia, Haiti, Madagascar, Mozambique and Senegal rely. ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Shipping emissions can lead to high local ocean acidification

    Strong acids formed from shipping emissions can produce seasonal ‘hot spots’ of ocean acidification, a recent study finds. These hot spots, in ocean areas close to busy shipping lanes, could have negative effects on local marine ecology and commercially farmed seafood species. Oceans have become more acidic since pre-industrial times. The average global ocean pH – which ...

  • GBP 11m to protect our seas from climate change

    A five-year, GBP 11million study into the effects of climate change on Britain's seas has been announced as scientists warn of more acidic seas affecting the food chain. Ocean acidity, caused by increased amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the sea, has risen 30 per cent in the last 200 years, faster than any time in the last 65million years, with serious implications for sealife and our climate, ...

  • Growth of algae affected by ocean acidification and nutrient pollution

    Ocean acidification and eutrophication may affect the growth of microscopic algae — phytoplankton — with knock-on impacts for marine food chains and fisheries, warns a new study. By growing phytoplankton under different scenarios the researchers found that phytoplankton species are affected differently according to the acidity and nutrient content of the water. Ocean acidification is ...

  • Interior Department Announces $11.8 Million to Support Tribal Climate Change Adaptation and Planning Projects

    As part of the Obama Administration’s effort to prepare communities for the impacts of climate change, U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell today announced that the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) has awarded $11.8 million in Tribal Climate Resilience Program funding awards. The funding will help federally recognized Tribes and tribally chartered organizations with climate change ...


    By US Department of Energy

  • CO2 threats to world`s oceans risings scientists warn

    In Monaco, scientists at the IAEA's Marine Environment Laboratories (MEL) have joined more than 150 experts from 26 countries calling for urgent actions to halt rising levels of acidity in the world's oceans. 'It is the other CO2 problem that must be grappled with alongside climate change. Reining in this double threat, caused by our dependence on fossil fuels, is the challenge of the century,' ...

  • Climate change could shrink oyster habitat in California

    Ocean acidification is bad news for shellfish, as it makes it harder for them to form their calcium-based shells. But climate change could also have multiple other impacts that make California bays less hospitable to shelled organisms like oysters, which are a key part of the food web. Changes to water temperature and chemistry resulting from human-caused climate change could shrink the prime ...


    By ScienceDaily

  • Global alliance to study planetary changes revealed

    A global alliance of environmental research agencies, policy organisations and international donors will be launched at the Planet Under Pressure conference in London, United Kingdom, later this month (26–29 March). The 'Future Earth' alliance aims to deliver scientific and social science research in a way that policymakers and grassroots groups would understand to help them meet their ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Carbon Dioxide Concentration Surges

    The amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere reached a new record high in 2013, propelled by a surge in levels of carbon dioxide. This is according to the World Meteorological Organization’s annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin, which injected even greater urgency into the need for concerted international action against accelerating and potentially devastating climate change. The Greenhouse ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Record Greenhouse Gas Levels Impact Atmosphere and Oceans

    The amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere reached a new record high in 2013, propelled by a surge in levels of carbon dioxide. This is according to the World Meteorological Organization’s annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin, which injected even greater urgency into the need for concerted international action against accelerating and potentially devastating climate change. The Greenhouse ...

  • New Technology for Ocean Acidification Research

    Ocean pH has dropped from approximately 8.2 to 8.1 pH over the past 200 years, representing a 25% increase in acidity. The development of better instruments to measure ocean pH, particularly in the deep ocean, is vital to understanding the magnitude and impact of these changes. High-resolution in-situ measurements of pH in the ocean are now possible with innovative adaptations to ion sensitive ...

  • Ocean acidification set to spiral out of control

    The continued release of greenhouse gases into the air is set to bring about huge changes to land ecosystems as they are forced to adapt to rising temperatures. But the marine world — which is just as integral to human existence yet receives little attention during climate negotiations — will endure a similarly tumultuous time as emissions rise, scientists say. “Changing ...


    By SciDev.Net

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