ocean current measurement News

  • The cold deep currents in the Atlantic Ocean that help shape our climate

    For more than a decade scientists from the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton have been travelling to the subtropical Atlantic to collect data that provide important information about our changing climate. Just 15 miles from the sandy shores and coral reefs of the Bahamas the ocean floor plunges down to depths of over two-and-a-half miles. Along this steep slope dozens of sensitive ...

  • New radar satellite technique sheds light on ocean current dynamics

    Ocean surface currents have long been the focus of research due to the role they play in weather, climate and transportation of pollutants, yet essential aspects of these currents remain unknown. By employing a new technique – based on the same principle as police speed-measuring radar guns – to satellite radar data, scientists can now obtain information necessary to understand better the ...


    By European Space Agency (ESA)

  • Tracing CO2 elements in the ocean

    The surface waters of the vast Southern Ocean are suffering from 'marine anaemia' – a serious deficiency in the micronutrient iron. Just as iron deficiency negatively affects the health and productivity of humans and other land-based creatures, so it affects the phytoplankton (microscopic marine plants) existing in the oceanic realm. The environmental consequences of this condition restrict ...


    By Australian Government

  • Are the world’s oceans on the brink of disaster?

    An international panel of marine experts warns in a report released today that the world's ocean is at high risk of entering a phase of extinction of marine species unprecedented in human history. The preliminary report arises from the first ever interdisciplinary international workshop to consider the cumulative impact of all stressors affecting the ocean. Considering the latest research across ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Microplastics discovered in the deep, open ocean

    A unique study by scientists at the National Oceanography Centre (NOC) will provide valuable new insights into the concentrations of microplastics in the open ocean from surface to the sea bed. Professor Richard Lampitt and Dr Katsia Pabortsava, who lead microplastic research at NOC, said “There is considerable uncertainty about the concentration and characteristics of the many ...

  • CO2 removal cannot save the oceans

    Greenhouse-gas emissions from human activities do not only cause rapid warming of the seas, but also ocean acidification at an unprecedented rate. Artificial carbon dioxide removal (CDR) from the atmosphere has been proposed to reduce both risks to marine life. A new study based on computer calculations now shows that this strategy would not work if applied too late. CDR cannot compensate for ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • New ‘seawater’ – the way ahead for ocean science

    A proposed new definition of ‘seawater’ is drawing the attention of the world’s oceanographic community in a change that will advance the accuracy of climate science projections.The science case for a change in the definition of seawater was first agreed to in 2006 when the international guiding body, the Scientific Committee on Oceans Research (SCOR) established a working group, chaired by Dr ...

  • 270,000 tons of plastic waste floating in oceans

    A new study estimates nearly 270,000 tons of plastic is floating in the world's oceans. That's enough to fill more than 38,500 garbage trucks. The plastic is broken up into more than 5 trillion pieces, said the study published Wednesday in the scientific journal PLOS ONE. The paper is the latest in a nascent field where scientists are ...


    By Associated Press

  • Indian Ocean pirates impede climate observations

    Australian scientists have sought the help of the United States and Australian navies to plug a critical gap in their Argo ocean and climate monitoring program caused by Somali pirates operating in the western Indian Ocean. "We have not been able to seed about one quarter of the Indian Ocean since the increase in the piracy and that has implications for understanding a region of ...

  • Time to stop losing ocean data to vandalism

    More must be done to prevent damage of ocean data buoys that costs money, vital data — and lives, say Sidney Thurston and M. Ravichandran. The global community relies on a rapidly expanding ocean observing network to understand the climate and ecosystems, to help warn against ocean-borne hazards such as tsunamis and storm surges caused by cyclones, and to support sea rescue ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Ocean warming detrimental to inshore fish species

    The findings of a study published today in Nature Climate Change indicate negative effects on the growth of a long-lived south-east Australian and New Zealand inshore species – the banded morwong. Scientific monitoring since 1944 by CSIRO at Maria Island, off the east coast of Tasmania, showed that surface water temperatures in the Tasman Sea have risen by nearly 2°C over the past 60 ...

  • Oceans` uptake of manmade carbon may be slowing

    The oceans play a key role in regulating climate, absorbing more than a quarter of the carbon dioxide that humans put into the air. Now, the first year-by-year accounting of this mechanism during the industrial era suggests the oceans are struggling to keep up with rising emissions—a finding with potentially wide implications for future climate. The study appears in this week’s issue of the ...

  • Measuring water from space

    Observations from satellites now allow scientists to monitor changes to water levels in the sea, in rivers and lakes, in ice sheets and even under the ground. As the climate changes, this information will be crucial for monitoring its effects and predicting future impacts in different regions. Sea level rise in one of the major consequences of global warming, but it is much more difficult to ...


    By European Science Foundation

  • Arctic Ocean Ice Thinner By Half in Six Years

    BREMERHAVEN, Germany, September 14, 2007 (ENS) - Large areas of Arctic sea ice are only one meter thick this year, about 50 percent thinner than they were in the year 2001, according to measurements taken by 50 scientists on board the research ship Polarstern. The international team is conducting research on sea ice in the central Arctic Basin.'The ice cover in the North Polar Sea is ...

  • Prince Albert II of Monaco Joins the Global Ocean Commission and UNEP in Calling for Comprehensive Ocean Governance

    With the fate of the Earth's marine environment hanging in the balance and human-induced challenges accelerating, ocean champions from around the globe - including His Serene Highness Prince Albert II of Monaco and the former Heads of State, Ministers and business leaders of the Global Ocean Commission - have joined forces in a clarion call for comprehensive and integrated ocean governance. The ...

  • NASA To Launch Ocean Wind Monitor To Space Station

    In a clever reuse of hardware originally built to test parts of NASA's QuikScat satellite, the agency will launch the ISS-RapidScat instrument to the International Space Station in 2014 to measure ocean-surface wind speed and direction. The ISS-RapidScat instrument will help improve weather forecasts, including hurricane monitoring, and understanding of how ocean-atmosphere interactions influence ...

  • Record Greenhouse Gas Levels Impact Atmosphere and Oceans

    The amount of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere reached a new record high in 2013, propelled by a surge in levels of carbon dioxide. This is according to the World Meteorological Organization’s annual Greenhouse Gas Bulletin, which injected even greater urgency into the need for concerted international action ...

  • Scientists warn of profound changes in World`s oceans

    Climate change is transforming the world's oceans by increasing the temperature and acidity of seawater, and altering atmospheric and oceanic circulation, reported a panel of scientists this week at the American Association for the Advancement of Science, AAAS, annual meeting in Boston.  'The vastness of our oceans may have engendered a sense of complacency about potential impacts from ...

  • NASA Discovers Unprecedented Blooms Of Ocean Plant Life

     Scientists have made a biological discovery in Arctic Ocean waters as dramatic and unexpected as finding a rainforest in the middle of a desert. A NASA-sponsored expedition punched through three-foot thick sea ice to find waters richer in microscopic marine plants, essential to all sea life, than any other ocean region on ...

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