oceanographic sampling News

  • AC-CESS Co Uk Ltd announces AC-ROV sales news

    Leading micro ROV manufacturer AC-CESS Co UK Ltd (Aberdeen, Scotland) has reported a number of last quarter 2008 successes with its AC-ROV Underwater Inspection System including the following: The company has achieved its first 2 sales in the Russian Federation with AC-ROV distributor Underwater Technique and Tetis Pro both of Moscow, purchasing high specification systems for undisclosed clients. ...


    By AC-CESS Co Uk Ltd

  • Robotic glider to map Moreton Bay impacts

    Dr Andy Steven from CSIRO's Wealth from Oceans Flagship says the glider’s deployment is part of a research program to monitor the extent of the flood plume into Moreton Bay and assess its effects. “This disastrous flood also provides us with a rare opportunity to understand how our marine ecosystems respond to massive inputs of fresh water and sediments,” Dr Steven says. ...

  • Tracing CO2 elements in the ocean

    The surface waters of the vast Southern Ocean are suffering from 'marine anaemia' – a serious deficiency in the micronutrient iron. Just as iron deficiency negatively affects the health and productivity of humans and other land-based creatures, so it affects the phytoplankton (microscopic marine plants) existing in the oceanic realm. The environmental consequences of this condition restrict ...


    By Australian Government

  • Satnav reflection technology for remote sensing of the Earth

    A rain of navigation signals falls constantly upon the Earth from GPS and the initial satellites in Europe's Galileo system, enabling an ever-increasing number of positioning and guidance services. Afterwards these microwave beams bounce back to space – where a proposed ESA mission aims to harness them as a scientific resource and explore their potential for terrestrial remote sensing ...


    By European Space Agency (ESA)

  • Climate changes ensnare Antarctic predator

    Climate change has begun to take its toll of one of Antarctica’s top predators. The Antarctic fur seal is being born with a lower weight and tends to breed later than earlier generations − almost certainly in response to the reduced availability of its prime food, krill. But the fur seal (Arctocephalus gazelle) is also changing in other ways. ...


    By Climate News Network

  • European Space Agency contributes to ocean carbon cycle research

    The Earth’s oceans play a vital role in the carbon cycle, making it imperative that we understand marine biological activity enough to predict how our planet will react to the extra 25,000 million tonnes of carbon dioxide humans are pumping into the atmosphere annually. The colour of oceanic seawater depends largely on the number of microscopic phytoplankton, marine plants that live in the ...

  • Indian Ocean pirates impede climate observations

    Australian scientists have sought the help of the United States and Australian navies to plug a critical gap in their Argo ocean and climate monitoring program caused by Somali pirates operating in the western Indian Ocean. "We have not been able to seed about one quarter of the Indian Ocean since the increase in the piracy and that has implications for understanding a region of ...

  • Toxic algae blooming in warm water from California to Alaska

    A vast bloom of toxic algae off the West Coast is denser, more widespread and deeper than scientists feared even weeks ago, according to surveyors aboard a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration research vessel. This coastal ribbon of microscopic algae, up to 40 miles wide and 650 feet deep in places, is flourishing amid unusually warm Pacific Ocean temperatures. It now stretches from at ...


    By Associated Press

  • Aquarius Yields NASA`s First Global Map of Ocean Salinity

    NASA's new Aquarius instrument has produced its first global map of the salinity of the ocean surface, providing an early glimpse of the mission's anticipated discoveries. Aquarius, which is aboard the Aquarius/SAC-D (Satelite de Aplicaciones Cientificas) observatory, is making NASA's first space ...

  • Deep concern over invisible threat to Antarctic glaciers

    The Antarctic ice shelf is under threat from a silent, invisible agency – and the rate of melting of glaciers has trebled in the last two decades. The ocean waters of the deep circumpolar current that swirl around the continent have been getting measurably warmer and nearer the ocean surface over the last 40 years, and now they could be accelerating glacier flow by melting the ...


    By Climate News Network

  • McLane research named 2017 MA small business exporter of the year

    The Small Business Administration (SBA) has selected McLane Research Laboratories, Inc. as 2017 Exporter of the Year for the Commonwealth of MA. ...

  • BAS begins monitoring waters under largest ice shelf in Antarctica

    It was 1914 when the famed British explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton advertised for crew to attempt the first trans-continental crossing of Antarctica. “Small wages, bitter cold, long months of complete darkness, constant danger, safe return doubtful,” he wrote. A hundred years later, some things haven’t changed—and many things have. In spite of its bitter cold and long ...


    By RBR Ltd.

  • Grants for $1.75 Million Awarded to Improve Public Health in New England Communities

    EPA’s New England office is awarding 21 grants across New England to fund community projects addressing environmental and public health issues. The projects, funded under the 2015 Healthy Communities Grant Program for a total of $1,754,157, will reduce environmental risks, protect and improve human health, and improve the quality of life for communities and residents in communities in all ...

  • Go big or go home: instrumenting the nearshore

    Leaning over the side of the 22-foot boat and pulling up the first line of temperature sensors, oceanographer Jamie MacMahan described the state of the line as the worst bio-fouling he had ever seen. It was slimy and smelly. One down, 34 more to go. This was only a pilot project, but MacMahan’s mantra of ‘Go big or go home’ meant that more than 300 instruments were attached to ...


    By RBR Ltd.

  • Developing nations join R&D race for gas hydrates

    It looks like chunks of ice — but put a flame to it and it goes ablaze. Touch it, and you’ll feel an odd sizzling sensation. This peculiar compound is methane hydrate. Not only might it become the source of the world’s next energy bonanza, but it could also let some coastal developing nations leapfrog coal and other ...


    By SciDev.Net

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