oceanographic sampling equipment News

  • Study: Oil in Gulf likely came from rig wreckage

    A team of researchers has concluded that pockets of oil trapped in the wreckage of the sunken Deepwater Horizon are the likely source of oil sheens that have been spotted in the Gulf of Mexico near the site of the deadly 2010 explosion on the BP-leased drilling rig. A newly published study by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and the University of California at Santa Barbara rules out BP's ...


    By Associated Press

  • Industry collaboration helps NOC study climate

    Measuring devices being installed on a cargo ship will provide oceanographers with vital data on the oceans’ ability to slow the build-up of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere as part of a major new collaboration between industry and the National Oceanography Centre (NOC). The cargo ship belongs to the China Navigation Company (CNCo) who are partly funding this project. Scientists from the ...

  • Free public open house on EPA’s ocean research vessel - Boston on Sunday, June 27, 11AM – 4PM (MA)

    Explore the new Harborwalk in Downtown Boston with a fun and informative tour of EPA’s Ocean Survey Vessel “The Bold,” on Sunday, June 27 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Boston Fan Pier. There will be a TOUCH TANK full of sea organisms from New England waters provided by the New England Aquarium. Kids of all ages will be able to see research equipment up close and learn from marine ...

  • Satnav reflection technology for remote sensing of the Earth

    A rain of navigation signals falls constantly upon the Earth from GPS and the initial satellites in Europe's Galileo system, enabling an ever-increasing number of positioning and guidance services. Afterwards these microwave beams bounce back to space – where a proposed ESA mission aims to harness them as a scientific resource and explore their potential for terrestrial remote sensing ...


    By European Space Agency (ESA)

  • BAS begins monitoring waters under largest ice shelf in Antarctica

    It was 1914 when the famed British explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton advertised for crew to attempt the first trans-continental crossing of Antarctica. “Small wages, bitter cold, long months of complete darkness, constant danger, safe return doubtful,” he wrote. A hundred years later, some things haven’t changed—and many things have. In spite of its bitter cold and long ...


    By RBR Ltd.

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