organic pollutants News

  • Soil pollution comes under scrutiny

    Soil pollution, due mostly to human activities that leave excess chemicals in soils used to grow food, took centre stage at the 5th Global Soil Partnership (GSP) Plenary Assembly held at FAO headquarters this week. Excess nitrogen and trace metals such as arsenic, cadmium, lead and mercury can impair plant metabolism and cut crop productivity, ultimately putting pressure on arable land. When they ...

  • Pollution Prevention: Where Sustainability Begins

    Benjamin Franklin famously wrote, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” It’s true—stopping something bad from happening is easier than fixing it later. This is the core concept behind the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) pollution prevention efforts. Reducing the amount of pollution produced means less waste to control, treat, or dispose of. ...

  • Using micro-organisms to monitor river health

    Monitoring changes in microscopic organisms called diatoms can assist in evaluating the quality of water over an entire river watershed. Researchers from France have developed a new index that could help Member States fulfill the EU's Water Framework Directive 2000 (WFD). The WFD aims to achieve good ecological and chemical status in surface water bodies by the year 2015. Diatoms are a type of ...

  • Air pollutant emissions to exceed limits

    In 2010, around half of the European Union's Member States expect to surpass one or more of the legal limits set by the National Emission Ceilings Directive (NEC Directive). The annual status report released today by the European Environment Agency (EEA) confirms that 11 countries anticipate an exceedance of their ceilings for NOx — some by more than 40 %. Of the four pollutants ...

  • Global Agreement on Mercury Pollution In the Works

    The soaring price of gold may be increasing mercury pollution locally and worldwide. The poisonous heavy metal is used to extract gold from ore in many artisanal mining operations which involve millions of workers and their families. Experts also worry that the increased burning of coal, which naturally contains mercury, is causing the toxic to be released into the air and spread around the ...

  • EPA recognizes 52 organizations for environmental stewardship

    Today, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recognized 52 organizations for their environmental stewardship during a Sustainable Materials Management recognition ceremony at Richland Community College in Garland, Texas. The ceremony recognized their environmental records under the EPA’s National Partnership for Environmental Priorities (NPEP), WasteWise Program, School Chemical ...

  • EPA Recognizes Individuals, Organizations for Climate Change Leadership

    Today the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Center for Corporate Climate Leadership hosted the second annual Climate Leadership Awards, with the Association of Climate Change Officers (ACCO), the Center for Climate and Energy Solutions (C2ES) and The Climate Registry (TCR). Twenty three winners will be given awards for their leadership in reducing carbon pollution and addressing ...

  • EPA Awards Environmental Education Grant to Vermont Organization

    A Vermont organization that educates students about climate science was awarded $91,000 by the US Environmental Protection Agency to better prepare youth for the challenges of climate change. The Vermont Energy Education Program in Montpelier received the funding for its Vermont Climate Change & Education Project, which educates elementary and high school students and teachers throughout the ...

  • Human and physical geography affect organic nutrients in streams

    Rainfall causes carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus, dissolved from natural, agricultural and urban sources, to run into rivers. This can affect water quality by promoting eutrophication, pollution and affecting water temperature and clarity. Researchers have recently studied differences in concentrations of these nutrients in streams across Europe. The Water Framework1 and Urban Wastewater2 ...

  • INSIGHTS: The Earth Needs a UN Environment Organization

    {Editor's Note: This speech was given by French President Jacques Chirac on the occasion of the Citizens of the Earth conference for global ecological governance on February 2, 2007} By President Jacques Chirac PARIS, France (ENS) - The planet is sick. The symptoms are its increasingly frequent extreme reactions - hurricanes, floods and droughts. Nature is sick. ...

  • Pyrolisis of Organic Waste - Old Technique, New Implementation

    Oil produced by pyrolisis of organic waste could become an important source of renewable energy. The Dutch company BTG has recently delivered Malaysia’s first pyrolisis plant. Pyrolisis is a well-established technique which goes back to the 1950s. Essentially, it consists in reducing the primary or raw material at a very high temperature. In this case, organic waste is brought very rapidly to ...


  • Arab States Form New Sustainable Development Organization

    NAIROBI, Kenya (ENS) - Arab countries are working together to achieve sustainable development in a new regional nongovernmental organization backed by both public and private sectors. The Arab Forum for Environment and Development was introduced to the international environmental community today at the Governing Council of the UN Environment Programme underway in Nairobi. The Arab ...

  • International organizations to cooperate on greenhouse gas accounting

    In a move that will bolster confidence among the growing number of companies seeking to understand and manage their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, three organizations today announced that they will work together to promote their GHG accounting and reporting standards. ISO (International Organization for Standardization), the World Resources Institute (WRI) and the World Business Council for ...

  • Connecticut organization selected for EPA environmental education grant

    Education Connection was one of 74 organizations in New England to apply for funding and one of four to receive part of the $219,094 awarded. The funding will be used to train 10 teachers from five middle schools in western Connecticut on ways to integrate the environment into their curricula. The teachers will each get 20 hours of training and informal instruction as needed through the project. ...

  • Maine organization selected for EPA environmental education grant

    Mt. Desert Island Biological Lab was one of 74 organizations in New England to apply for funding and one of four to receive part of the $219,094 awarded. The funding will be used over two years to educate students at Bangor and Waterville Senior High School about marine vegetative environments through stewardship activities. Students will take part in activities such as eel grass restoration and ...

  • Bioremediation of antibiotic pollution by a salt-marsh plant

    The effects of antibiotic contamination may be attenuated by the common reed, new research shows. The study found that the common reed (Phragmites australis), sourced from a temperate estuary with brackish water, had capacity for the bioremediation of the veterinary antibiotic enrofloxacin (ENR). The authors suggest that salt-marsh plants and their associated micro-organisms could be a valuable ...

  • Using GIS tools to analyze, compute, and predict pollution

    Preterm birth, the leading cause of neonatal mortality in the U.S., may be associated with exposure to legacy and emergent contaminants in the environment. Puerto Rico has one of the highest rates of preterm birth, as well as density of Superfund Sites in the United States. As part of NIEHS’s Superfund Research Program, the Puerto Rico Test site for Exploring Contamination Threats (PROTECT) ...


    By EarthSoft, Inc

  • Record pollution fine for McDonald`s supplier in China

    A french fry supplier to the McDonald's restaurant chain in China has been issued Beijing's biggest-ever pollution fine for releasing dirty wastewater, state media reported. The official Xinhua News Agency said late Wednesday that Beijing environmental officials levied a record fine of 3.8 million yuan, or more than $650,000, against Beijing ...


    By Associated Press

  • China to target polluters with tougher fines and penalties

    China's Supreme Court and environmental protection agencies have issued a new judicial explanations that will impose harsher punishments on polluters. The new rules, which take effect this week, are intended to streamline the process for investigating environmental pollution cases and in convicting polluters. With more precise criteria for convictions and sentencing, the new rules are expected to ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

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