photosynthesis analyser News

  • A new leaf turns in carbon science

    A new insight into global photosynthesis, the chemical process governing how ocean and land plants absorb and release carbon dioxide, has been revealed in research that will assist scientists to more accurately assess future climate change. In a paper published today in Nature, a team of US, Dutch and Australian scientists have estimated that the global rate of photosynthesis, the ...

  • Oil spills raise ocean arsenic levels

    Oil spills can increase levels of toxic arsenic in the ocean, creating an additional long-term threat to the marine ecosystem. Research published in the journal Water Research describes how oil spills and leakages clog up seabed sediments, preventing them from bonding with arsenic and burying it safely underground. Arsenic is a poisonous chemical element found in minerals and is present ...

  • Air pollution slows growth of coral reefs in the Caribbean

    Periods of slow growth observed in coral reefs in the Caribbean are caused by aerosols in the air from pollution and volcanic activity, recent research suggests. Aerosols cause cooler sea surface temperatures and reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the coral, both of which slow coral growth. Coral reefs are among the world’s most important ecosystems, providing habitats for many marine ...

  • Impact of climate change on marine algae

    With climate change looming large, countries around the world are mobilising their top scientists in an effort to measure its impact on the environment and society. One such scientist is the young Dr Björn Rost, who was recently awarded a EUR 1.4 million Independent Researcher Grant by the European Research Council (ERC). His research will focus on the impact of climate change on micro algae in ...

  • Tracing CO2 elements in the ocean

    The surface waters of the vast Southern Ocean are suffering from 'marine anaemia' – a serious deficiency in the micronutrient iron. Just as iron deficiency negatively affects the health and productivity of humans and other land-based creatures, so it affects the phytoplankton (microscopic marine plants) existing in the oceanic realm. The environmental consequences of this condition restrict ...


    By Australian Government

  • Ocean pH value decreasing

    A research project into ocean acidification has increased knowledge about conditions in the Baltic Sea and Kattegat-Skagerrak. When the pH value falls, the whole marine ecosystem is affected. A newly developed measurement technique provides information about natural variations in the oceans, which results in improved environmental monitoring. Since 1850 the pH value of the world’s ...

  • ESA investigates new methods of mapping tropical forest from space

    Tropical rainforests play a crucial role in Earth's carbon cycle by absorbing carbon from the atmosphere and storing it in biomass. However, mapping these carbon stocks from space poses a huge technical challenge. An airborne campaign, being carried out in South America, is showing how spaceborne radar could be an answer. In order to improve our understanding of the carbon cycle, more accurate ...


    By European Space Agency (ESA)

  • Greenhouse Gas Benchmark of 400 Parts per Million reached and excceded

    For the first time since the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration began tracking carbon dioxide in the global atmosphere, the monthly global average concentration of this greenhouse gas surpassed 400 parts per million in March 2015, according to NOAA’s latest results. ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • The 2012 LIFE+ projects

    Austria 4 projects (14.5 million) LIFE+ Environment Policy and Governance (1 project – 3.6 million) LIFE-URBANLAKE (Stadt Wien – Magistratsabteilung 45 – Wiener Gewässer): This project intends to define strategies to reduce the vulnerability of the “Alte Donau” from effects of climate ...

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