photosynthesis monitoring equipment News

  • Photon Technology International Announces Winner Of Their Spring 2014 Equipment Grant Competition

    Photon Technology International (PTI), now HORIBA Scientific, is proud to announce that Dr. Theresa McCormick, from Portland State University, was the winner of our Spring 2014 Equipment Grant Competition. Dr. McCormick, will receive $10,000 to use towards the purchase of PTI product(s). Dr. McCormick‘s research is focused on developing photoreductive elimination catalysts for solar energy ...


    By HORIBA Europe GmbH

  • Trees could be used to monitor air pollution simply and cheaply

    It may be possible to use trees to monitor levels of air pollution in cities, new research suggests. A Belgian study found evidence that leaves of urban trees change both chemically and physiologically when exposed to different levels of air pollution. If these changes are carefully quantified, trees could provide cheap and widespread ‘bio-indicators’, the study’s authors ...

  • Primary Productivity Monitoring in the Antarctic using CTG FastOcean FRRf System

    Marine photosynthesis is responsible for approximately half the oxygen in our atmosphere. In other words the oxygen in every second breath we take comes from the ocean. For the last 10 years Professor Andrew McMinn and his team from the Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies, University of Tasmania have been using a Chelsea  ...


    By Chelsea Technologies Group

  • CAS DataLoggers offers new multipurpose co2 logger

    CAS DataLoggers and T&D have teamed to offer customers an ideal solution for monitoring indoor air quality and HVAC&R system performance: the new TR-76Ui CO2 + Temperature + Humidity Logger. This low-cost 3-in-1 datalogger is now available in two versions: the TR-76Ui with T&D’s standard temperature and humidity specifications, and the TR-76UiH which is designed for laboratory ...


    By CAS DATALOGGERS

  • Scientists track chemical changes in cells as they endure extreme conditions

    One of nature’s most gripping feats of survival is now better understood. For the first time, scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory observed the chemical changes in individual cells that enable them to survive conditions that should kill them. The team tracked the chemical changes in Desulfovibrio vulgaris, which is a single-cell bacterium that ...

  • The 2012 LIFE+ projects

    Austria 4 projects (14.5 million) LIFE+ Environment Policy and Governance (1 project – 3.6 million) LIFE-URBANLAKE (Stadt Wien – Magistratsabteilung 45 – Wiener Gewässer): This project intends to define strategies to reduce the vulnerability of the “Alte Donau” from effects of climate ...

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