plankton analyser News

  • Ocean fertiliser could help plankton trap carbon, but by how much?

    Enhancing the ability of the ocean's phytoplankton bloom to lock away carbon is one proposal in the fight against climate change. A recent study in the Southern Ocean has found that natural sources of iron increase carbon absorption by phytoplankton by two to three times. This suggests that artificial fertilisation with iron could aid carbon removal, but in much lower quantities than predicted by ...

  • ASTM D4638 - 11 standard guide for preparation of biological samples for inorganic chemical analysis

    The chemical analysis of biological material, collected from such locations as streams, rivers, lakes, and oceans can provide information of environmental significance. The chemical analysis of biological material used in toxicity tests may be useful to better interpret the toxicological results. Many aquatic biological samples, either as a result of their size, or their method of collection, ...


    By ASTM International

  • Ocean pH value decreasing

    A research project into ocean acidification has increased knowledge about conditions in the Baltic Sea and Kattegat-Skagerrak. When the pH value falls, the whole marine ecosystem is affected. A newly developed measurement technique provides information about natural variations in the oceans, which results in improved environmental monitoring. Since 1850 the pH value of the world’s ...

  • North Atlantic ecosystems under threat at `critical` sea temperature

    Rising sea temperatures place various pressures on marine species, sometimes causing dramatic ecosystem-wide changes. A new study has found that in the North Atlantic these 'shifts' tend to occur around a critical temperature threshold. As these temperatures are predicted to reach northern areas of Europe over the coming century, careful monitoring and planning is needed to anticipate and manage ...

  • Marine species richness is not highest at equator

    New research indicates that zones closest to the equator have less species diversity than previously thought. A research team from the University of Auckland has reviewed 27 previously published studies and used the Ocean Biogeographic Information System (OBIS) to mine data on 65,000 marine species. The team, including doctoral candidate Chhaya Chaudhary, researcher Dr Hanieh Saeedi and Associate ...


    By PaR Systems, Inc.

  • Historically plants limited CO2 sinks

    Weathering, or natural degradation, of silicon-containing rocks should have produced a significant carbon sink over the past 24 million years. A new study suggests that plants have reduced this sink and kept CO2 levels at a higher level. Natural sinks of CO2 play an important role in adaptation and mitigation policies for climate change. In order to predict future climate change, it is necessary ...

  • CSIRO’s supercomputer is Australia’s ‘greenest’

    Announced today at the international SC10 supercomputing conference in New Orleans, the Green500 List is a ranking of the TOP500 supercomputers by energy efficiency (performance speed per Watt of energy consumed). It highlights the growing power consumption of the world’s fastest computers and encourages owners to reduce their carbon footprint by using technology that improves energy ...

  • Deep-water fish remove over a million tonnes of CO2 in Irish-UK waters every year

    Deep-water fish living along the Irish-UK continental slope remove more than a million tonnes of CO2 from the atmosphere each year, according to a recent study. Continental slope ecosystems play an important role in carbon sequestration, which should be considered before exploiting deep-water resources, say the researchers. Transport of carbon from the ocean surface to deep water is affected by ...

  • Protozoa detect water toxins

    Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) biologist Scott Gallager has grand plans for his revolutionary Swimming Behavioural Spectrophotometer (SBS), which employs one-celled protozoa to detect toxins in water sources. The SBS has been selected as a 2010 ‘Better World\' technology by the Association of University Technology Managers. This success story was actually a concept which the US ...

  • Deep-water fish remove over a million tonnes of CO2 in Irish-UK waters every year

    Deep-water fish living along the Irish-UK continental slope remove more than a million tonnes of CO2 from the atmosphere each year, according to a recent study. Continental slope ecosystems play an important role in carbon sequestration, which should be considered before exploiting deep-water resources, say the researchers. Transport of carbon from the ocean surface to deep water is affected by ...

  • Long-term seawater analysis has global significance

    Since 1988, scientists from the University of Hawaii have been conducting almost monthly deep-sea research expeditions to collect water samples for subsequent laboratory analysis. Originally designed to characterize subtle long-term changes in environments that were believed to be stable, the work has revealed some surprising conclusions. For example, it has become evident that even in these ...

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