publish surface water data News

  • On 20th Anniversary of Effort, EPA Gives Charles River a B+ and Publishes Live Water Quality Data

    EPA has given a grade of “B+” for water quality in the Charles River during 2014. The grade reflects the slight drop in water quality, encouraging more work to be done. This is the 20th year EPA has issued a Charles River Report Card. EPA is announcing a grade of “B+” for the lower Charles River based on bacterial contamination found in analyzed samples collected by the ...

  • Bentley publishes May 2010 annual report

    Be Together: The Be Communities LIVE Conference – May 18, 2010 – At this gathering of infrastructure professionals, Bentley Systems, Incorporated, the leading company dedicated to providing comprehensive software solutions for the infrastructure that sustains our world, today announced the availability of its May 2010 Annual Report at ...

  • More than half of EU surface waters below ‘good’ ecological status

    Water pollution and physical modifications are still affecting the ecology of many of Europe’s lakes, rivers, transitional water bodies and coastal waters. These problems are likely to prevent the water bodies reaching ‘good’ status by 2015, a target set by the EU’s Water Framework Directive (WFD). The report, ‘ ...

  • New application notes published for the PeCOD Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) Technology

    Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) and Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) are important diagnostic parameters for the determination of water quality in natural waterways and waste streams. The standard BOD test requires five days to complete, and is therefore unable to provide continuous monitoring of organic load. COD is therefore often used for BOD screening. The PeCOD method for COD analysis is a new ...


    By MANTECH INC.

  • FlowWorks links to USGS and NOAA data

    FlowWorks, USA, can now accept real-time data directly from United States Geological Survey (USGS) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) monitoring stations. The addition of the USGS and NOAA data means over 2,500 precipitation stations, 9,000 stream flow stations, 1,300 groundwater level stations and 1,900 surface water quality stations and nearly 50 tide stations are ...

  • NASA data reveal major groundwater loss in California

    In research being presented this week at the American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco, scientists from NASA and the University of California, Irvine, detailed California's groundwater changes and outlined Grace-based research on other global aquifers. The twin Grace satellites monitor tiny month-to-month changes in Earth's gravity field primarily caused by the movement of water in ...

  • Ceramic water purifier testing

    An article published in the Journal of Water and Health describes the testing of low-cost ceramic water purifiers (CWPs) for their effectiveness in treating drinking water in Cambodia. Laboratory results indicate that the locally produced CWPs achieved reductions of E. coli of approximately 99%. Over 1 billion people worldwide lack access to improved ...

  • Urban water ecology

    Sewage overflows are a fact of life in urban areas, and in many cities, excess sewage water enters streams and lakes with rain runoff. Although this pollution is harmful to most organisms, there is one group of insects that thrives on it: mosquitoes. Luis Fernando Chaves, a post-doctoral researcher at Emory University, and his team discovered mosquitoes in abundance in a sewage-contaminated ...

  • Satellites unlock secret to vanishing water

    A team of hydrologists led by Matt Rodell of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., found that northern India's underground water supply is being pumped and consumed by human activities, such as irrigating cropland, and is draining aquifers faster than natural processes can replenish them. The results of this research were published today in Nature. The finding is based on data ...

  • PFOS not widespread contaminant of drinking water

    Although limited data exists on perfluorinated chemicals in water, a recent study published in CIWEM’s Water and Environment Journal has found that perfluorooctane sulphonate (PFOS) is not a widespread contaminant of drinking water in England. PFOS has a number of industrial and commercial uses, including as a surfactant for fire-fighting foam, a mist suppressant for metal-plating baths and ...

  • Everglades show improvement in water quality

    Researchers at the University of Florida Research and Education Centers and scientists at the South Florida Water Management District have published a report regarding the trends in water quality feeding into Everglades National Park. The report can be found in the September-October 2010 Journal of Environmental Quality, published by the American Society of Agronomy, the Crop Science Society of ...

  • Report assesses ‘produced water’ treatment

    Along with the crude oil and natural gas that fuels modern civilisation, the energy industry brings nearly 233 billion barrels of wastewater from beneath the earth’s surface every year. Lux Research surveys the challenges associated with treating ‘produced water’, and identifies which technologies and developers are best positioned to address the task. This ...

  • Using vegetated filter strips to improve water quality

    Microbial contamination of surface water resources is a critical water quality issue, leading to many documented health and environmental concerns. Vegetated filter strips have become an important component of water quality improvement by reducing sediment and nutrient transport to surface water. Although this management practice is also beneficial for controlling manure-borne pathogen transport ...

  • Study: Rising Seas Slowed by Increasing Water on Land

    New measurements from a NASA satellite have allowed researchers to identify and quantify, for the first time, how climate-driven increases of liquid water storage on land have affected the rate of sea level rise. A new study by scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, and the University of California, Irvine, shows that while ice sheets and glaciers ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Key role for Landsat in water-use maps

    Using Landsat imagery supplied by the U.S. Geological Survey in combination with ground-based water data, the Idaho Department of Water Resources and the University of Idaho developed a novel method to create water-use maps that are accurate to the scale of individual fields. The Ash Institute at Harvard University recently cited Idaho's original design for these maps as an outstanding innovation ...

  • MOE presents: provincial water monitoring networks

    Dave Rudolph – "Emerging Needs for Temporal and Spatial Data Precision" Dave Rudolph, with the University of Waterloo, started the symposium off with a very thought provoking presentation on the value of data. Dave used case studies to illustrate how different factors impact the quantity and quality of water resources, and how a small change can affect these conditions quickly and ...


    By Solinst Canada Ltd.

  • New ways of measuring our water environment

    General Quality Assessment figures from the Environment Agency released this week show that 76 per cent of all UK rivers in the UK achieved ‘good’ or better status for chemical water quality in 2007. From 2008, the new European Water Framework Directive replaces General Quality Assessment,  which means that the way of measuring the quality of our water bodies has changed. As well as rivers, ...

  • Rising carbon dioxide and ‘acidified` waters in puget sound

    Scientists have discovered that the water chemistry in the Hood Canal and the Puget Sound, US, main basin is becoming more "acidified," or corrosive, as the ocean absorbs more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. These changes could have considerable impacts on the region"s shellfish industry over the next several decades. The study, co-sponsored by NOAA, the University of Washington Applied ...

  • Satellites unlock secret to northern India`s vanishing water

    Using satellite data, UC Irvine and NASA hydrologists have found that groundwater beneath northern India has been receding by as much as 1 foot per year over the past decade – and they believe human consumption is almost entirely to blame.More than 109 cubic kilometers (26 cubic miles) of groundwater disappeared from the region's aquifers between 2002 and 2008 – double the capacity of India's ...


    By ScienceDaily

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