rising sea level News

  • Global warming and sea level rise

    A new review analyzing three decades of research on the historic effects of melting polar ice sheets found that global sea levels have risen at least six meters, or about 20 feet, above present levels on multiple occasions over the past three million years. What is most concerning, scientists say, is that amount of melting was caused by an increase of only 1-2 degrees (Celsius) in ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Rising Sea Levels – The New Reality

    Water may be flowing from the Greenland icecap and into the sea more quickly than anybody expected. It doesn’t mean that global warming has got conspicuously worse: rather, researchers have had to revise their understanding of the intricate physiology of the northern hemisphere’s biggest icecap. Climate calculations Since ...


    By Climate News Network

  • B.C. releases new sea level rise report

    A new report released by the B.C. Government shows governments will need to continue working together to meet the challenge of climate change and rising sea levels over the next 90 years and beyond. The report, Climate Change Adaption Guidelines for Sea Dikes and Coastal Flood Hazard Land Use, shows that sea ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Rising sea levels threaten islanders with displacement

    A significant rise in sea levels due to global warming could result in the loss of species and habitats in the coastal areas of more than a thousand islands in South-East Asia and the Pacific region, leading to the potential displacement of many ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • King tides – a glimpse of future sea level rise

    “By 2060 to 2070 we could be experiencing tides of at least this magnitude every month, rather than just twice a year due to climate-change induced sea level rise,” says a research scientist with CSIRO’s Climate Adaptation National Research Flagship, Dr Kathy McInnes. King tides are natural events that happen twice a year. The tides predicted for many parts of the east coast between 8am and ...

  • Indian Ocean sea levels `rising at different rates`

    Mapping variations in regional sea level changes of different parts of the Indian Ocean could help developing countries better adapt to the effects of climate change, according to a study published in Nature Geoscience last week (11 July). Researchers from the University of Colorado, United States, identified distinct patterns of sea-level rises using observational and satellite data combined ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Unsustainable water consumption contributes to sea level rise

    The global sea level is rising, yet only part of that rise can be attributed to the effects of climate change. New research has calculated that human impacts on terrestrial water storage make up around 42% of total sea level rise, in particular, the extraction of groundwater that eventually makes its way to the ocean. Tidal measurements have revealed that the global sea level rose by 1.8mm per ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Sea-level changes – 50 meters high and rising

    Burning all of the world’s available fossil-fuel resources would result in the complete melting of the Antarctic ice sheet, a new study published in Science Advances shows. The Antarctic ice masses store water equivalent to more than 50 meters of sea-level rise. The new calculations show that Antarctica’s long-term contribution to sea-level rise could likely be restricted to a few ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • We will need to adapt to rising sea levels

    “The good news is that a recent concentration of science resources is improving our insight into ocean and ice dynamics, and scientific measurement of the rate of sea-level rise,” says the book’s lead editor, CSIRO Fellow and oceanographer Dr John Church. “The way the world responds to climate change will become increasingly reliant on a sophisticated integrated ...

  • EPA releases report on sea level rise

    The US Environmental Protection Agency, in collaboration with other agencies, has released a report that discusses the impacts of sea level rise on the coast, coastal communities, and the habitats and species that depend on them. The report, Coastal Sensitivity to Sea-Level Rise: A Focus on the Mid-Atlantic Region, examines multiple opportunities for governments and coastal communities to plan ...

  • Survey: house buyers response to sea level rise

    According to CSIRO researcher Dr Nick Abel, the survey will help local and state governments make policy decisions on future coastal property and infrastructure developments. "We are asking people about what they think about purchasing properties in coastal areas," Dr Abel said. "We are also interested in their perspectives on sea level rise and how this influences their choices in purchasing ...

  • When sea levels rise, damage costs rise even faster

    Damages from extreme events like floods are even more relevant than the mean sea level itself when it comes to the costs of climate impacts for coastal regions. However, while it is now rather well understood how sea-levels will rise in the future, only small progress has been made estimating how the implied damage for cities at the coasts will increase during the next decades. A team of ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Rising Sea levels threaten millions by boosting storm surges

    Sea level rise due to global warming has already doubled the annual risk of coastal flooding of historic proportions across widespread areas of the United States, according to a new report from Climate Central. By 2030, many locations are likely to see storm surges combining with sea level rise to raise waters at least 4 feet above the ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • The warmer the higher: sea-level rise from Filchner-Ronne ice in Antarctica

    The more ice is melted of the Antarctic Filchner-Ronne shelf, the more ice flows into the ocean and the more the region contributes to global sea-level rise. While this might seem obvious, it is no matter of course for the huge ice masses of Antarctica: parts of the ice continent are characterized by instabilities that, once triggered, can lead to persistent ice discharge into the ocean even ...

  • Coastal wetlands can protect against rising sea levels and increasing storms

    Coastal wetlands can substantially reduce erosion, property damage and human deaths in the face of rising sea levels and severe storms, recent research concludes. Understanding whether wetlands can provide effective coastal protection is essential to developing effective climate change adaptation strategies. Over a third of the global population live in coastal areas, and the number of ...

  • Well-managed mangroves `can survive rising sea levels`

    The prevailing idea that sea-level rise will inevitably wipe out mangrove forests — fragile ecosystems that protect nearby communities from natural hazards such as floods and ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Complexity of glacier ice loss captured in new estimates of sea level rise

    Greenland’s four major glaciers could contribute 19 to 30 mm to sea level rise by 2200, according to a new study. The researchers developed a sophisticated model which provides new insight into the effects of climate change on Greenland’s glaciers, by capturing the complex processes involved in their movement and melt. Ice loss from Greenland’s Ice Sheet has been increasing over ...

  • Global sea-level rise at end of last ice age

    Southampton researchers have estimated that sea level rose by an average of about 1 metre per century at the end of the last Ice Age, interrupted by rapid ‘jumps' during which it rose by up to 2.5 metres per century. The findings, published in Global and Planetary Change, will help unravel the responses of ocean circulation and climate to large inputs of ice-sheet meltwater to the world ...


  • Tropical nations to see above average sea-level rises

    Coastal areas in the tropics may see some of the largest sea-level rises due to take place this century because of climate change, according to a study. This would particularly affect the Indian Ocean and Western ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Global sea level rise monitoring secured for next decade

    The transatlantic Jason-3 Programme has now been approved by EUMETSAT Member States thus ensuring a continuation of the series of measurements made by the Jason-2 satellite and its predecessors in support of meteorology, operational oceanography and in particular the monitoring of the sea level trend, a key indicator of climate change. Nineteen EUMETSAT Member States have agreed to subscribe to ...

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