scale degrading News

  • Humans have caused profound changes in Caribbean coral reefs

    Coral reefs in the Caribbean have suffered significant changes due to the proximal effects of a growing human population, reports a study published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, B. “It is well acknowledged that coral reefs are declining worldwide but the driving forces remain hotly debated,” said author Camilo Mora at Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada. “In the Caribbean ...

  • REDD project in Congo basin region

    GAF and a consortium of European and African partners submitted a proposal for the European Commission Framework Programme 7 (FP7) GMES Space Call in 2009, and were notified that this proposal received one of the highest evaluation points achievable in the FP7 programme. The focus of the programme is related to forest monitoring of deforestation and forest degradation which is required for the ...


  • New strain of bacteria could help clean up gulf oil spill

    Researchers have discovered a new strain of bacteria that can produce non-toxic, comparatively inexpensive "rhamnolipids," and effectively help degrade polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, or PAHs - environmental pollutants that are one of the most harmful aspects of oil spills. Because of its unique characteristics, this new bacterial strain could be of considerable value in the long-term cleanup ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Soil protection

    On 13 September, MEP Cristina Gutiérrez-Cortines presented the draft directive on soil protection to members of the European Parliament's ITRE committee (Industry, technology, research and energy). Ecological NGOs present at the meeting were not reassured. 'We are disappointed with it. This directive is in danger, when it could be an essential lever for a genuine policy on soil protection on a ...


  • UN launches decade-long efforts to tackle desertification

    The United Nations is launching the Decade for Deserts and the Fight against Desertification (2010-2020) today, an 11-year long effort to raise awareness and action to improve the protection and management of the world's drylands, home to a third of the world's population and which face serious economic and environmental threats. 'Continued land degradation - whether from climate change, ...

  • New study ranks countries on environment impact

    A new study led by the University of Adelaide's Environment Institute has ranked most of the world's countries for their environmental impact. The research uses seven indicators of environmental degradation to form two rankings - a proportional environmental impact index, where impact is measured against total resource availability, and an absolute ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • ADB grant extended to improve water resource management in Bangladesh

    A new grant extended to Bangladesh will continue efforts to improve development of the nation's small-scale water resources, which offer essential support to agricultural and fish production in one of the world's poorest countries. The Japan Special Fund is providing a $600,000 grant to design the Participatory Small-Scale Water Resources Project. The Asian Development Bank (ADB) will manage the ...


    By Asian Development Bank

  • Landfill sites: to air or not to air?

    The EU Landfill Directive sets out requirements to landfill waste in the least harmful way for the environment. For example, it aims to reduce the amount of biodegradable Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) going to landfill, and promotes the use of reasonable landfill fees under the 'polluter pays principle', thus making recovery an alternative to landfilling. However, although landfill will never be ...

  • Between Hungry People and Climate Change, Soils Need Help

    SELFOSS, Iceland, August 31, 2007 (ENS) - To meet the needs of a rapidly growing human population, more food must be produced over the coming 50 years than in the last 10,000 years combined, scientists say. But land degradation and desertification are undercutting the soil's ability to produce more food, causing an environmental crisis that affects one-third of all people on Earth, say experts ...

  • Future forests: will climate change affect wood-supply?

    While climate change is expected to increase growth rates in Europe's forests, society's demand for wood could outweigh these benefits, says a new study. Forest management techniques will therefore play a far more significant role in maintaining productivity and avoiding degradation than the effects of rising temperatures. Recent climate change projections indicate a rise in annual temperature ...

  • Scientists join forces to solve Australian seagrass mystery

    The release of a major study into the mysterious decline of Adelaide’s coastal seagrasses is helping to improve the marine environment along the metropolitan coastline. The work is a testament to the collaboration of more than 60 researchers from across Australia, says Adelaide Coastal Waters Study Director Professor David Fox. Professor Fox says the final report, released by the SA Government, ...

  • Non-Halogenated FR Plastic Sheeting...is it in our future?

    It looks like Halogenated Fire retardant additives will be outlawed in the coming years. That is what is on the horizon, with Europe reportedly leading the way in 2015! The problem with Halogenated materials is that while they are very effective flame retardants, they contribute to additional smoke generation. In recent years, public pressure has come from both public and governmental entities. ...


    By Global Plastic Sheeting

  • FMC to team with university researchers investigating bioremediation approaches to the Gulf Coast oil spill

    FMC Corporation has teamed with a number of university researchers to investigate augmented bioremediation of oil from the Deepwater Horizon incident in coastal wetlands and marshes in the Gulf of Mexico. The Texas Institute for Applied Environmental Research at Tarleton State University, Texas A & M Galveston Dept. of Marine Biology, Tarleton State Dept. of Engineering and FMC have formed a ...

  • Double trouble for water life

    Excess phosphorus and nitrogen produced by human activities on neighboring land is making its way into our coastal waters and degrading both water quality and aquatic life. Although historically the priority has been to control phosphorus, Professor Hans Paerl, from the University of North Carolina in the US, argues that nitrogen imbalance is equally damaging. He adds that a dual nutrient ...


    By Springer

  • Valuing nature protects biodiversity and reaps financial rewards

    A new global study1 on the economics of ecosystem services and biodiversity loss suggests that governments can achieve more resilient economies and receive higher rates of return on their public investment strategies when they recognise and target the value of ecosystem services. A new report highlights the economic consequences of not valuing ecosystem services and biodiversity, whose benefits ...

  • New funds support Queensland efforts for sustainable land management & more resilient ecosystems

    The Great Barrier Reef and Queensland’s Burdekin Dry Tropics rangelands are among the beneficiaries of a AUS$25.7 million Caring for our Country 2008-09 regional investment funding package announced today. Australian Government Ministers for the Environment, Heritage and the Arts, Peter Garrett, and Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Tony Burke, said the package would fund a range of activities ...


    By Australian Government

  • World bank funds eight countries to address climate change

    World Bank Climate Investment Funds (CIFs) have approved $1.08 billion in near-zero-interest loans and grants to support Bolivia, Honduras, India, Jamaica, Lao PDR, Mali, Mexico, and Nepal in their efforts toward arresting and adapting to climate change. Under the CIFs' Clean Technology Fund (CTF), an Investment Plan prepared by  India for $775 million was endorsed. With this financial ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Measuring global soil changes

    Global change is increasingly affecting important terrestrial ecosystem functions such as the filtering and buffering capacity of soils, the supply of clean water, soil fertility, and consequently, the production of food, feed, and fiber. Recent studies and reports from the United Nations indicate that water and soil resources are both heavily under pressure. Worldwide about 2 billion ha of land ...

  • Business must adapt to realities of Earth’s ecosystems

    Ecosystem Challenges and Business Implications, published today, warns that companies must transform business models and operations if they are to avoid major economic losses caused by the current degradation of ecosystems and the vital services they provide. The publication produced by Earthwatch Institute, the World Conservation Union (IUCN), the World Business Council for Sustainable ...


    By Earthwatch International

  • Progress Towards Our CGI Commitment to Action: Protecting and Restoring Carbon-Rich Wetlands for People and Planet

     In September 2011 Wetlands International announced its Commitment to Action under the Clinton Global Initiative (CGI) 'Securing Wetland Carbon Stores for Climate'. The global NGO aims to achieve emission reductions of at least 100 megatons by 2015, through the conservation and rehabilitation of carbon-rich wetlands. Now, one year later, ...


    By Wetlands International

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