seabed water sampling News

  • Microalgae sticks to microplastics and transports them to the seabed

    Fragments of microplastics are readily incorporated into groups of microscopic algae, altering the rate at which the plastics move through seawater, a recent study has found. In laboratory tests, polystyrene microbeads, which usually sink to the bottom of seawater at a rate of 4 mm a day, sank at a rate of several hundreds of metres a day when part of microalgae aggregates. Plastic debris litters ...

  • Discovery of an active methane gas system beneath Arctic seabed

    Researchers have discovered a methane gas system beneath the seabed off the west coast of Svalbard in the Arctic that has probably been active since the end of the last ice age, about 15,000 years ago. The methane, much of which is stored in the sediment beneath the seabed as methane hydrate, flows upwards to the seabed surface where it enters the water as plumes of bubbles. Led by Professor ...

  • BP Pledges $500 Million for Independent Research into Impact of Spill on Marine Environment

    May 24 2010 - BP today announced a commitment of up to $500 million to an open research program studying the impact of the Deepwater Horizon incident, and its associated response, on the marine and shoreline environment of the Gulf of Mexico. "BP has made a commitment to doing everything we can to lessen the impact of this tragic incident on the people and environment of the Gulf Coast. We must ...


    By BP - British Petroleum

  • First broad-scale maps of life on the sea-shelf

    They examined the shelf seascape during a three-year program of the Commonwealth Environment Research Facilities (CERF) Marine Biodiversity Hub. Hub director, Professor Nic Bax of CSIRO and the University of Tasmania, says the program developed and applied a consistent, national approach to biodiversity mapping. “The program compiled existing biological survey datasets, mapped 1868 square ...

  • Pollutants released by seafloor trawling affect marine life

    Commercial bottom trawling, the technique of pulling fishing gear across the seabed to catch fish and other seafood, releases pollutants trapped in the seabed, which can negatively affect local marine life and ecosystems. Recent findings from a Norwegian fjord show how mussels can take up high levels of contaminants released by trawling, with important health implications for consumers. ...

  • Scientists fear methane emissions from oceans and tundra due to warming

    Warming of the ocean in the Arctic over the last 30 years has triggered the release of methane from seabed sediments, according to U.K. researchers. During a recent Arctic survey, scientists from the National Oceanography Centre Southampton (NOCS) found more than 250 plumes of methane gas bubbles rising from the seabed in one area, at depths of about 500 to 1600 feet. The scientists believe the ...

  • Trawling threatens to destroy deep-sea ecosystems

    Intensive trawling could turn seafloor ecosystems into ‘deserts of the sea’, new research warns. The study found that continuous bottom trawling for shrimp in a deep-sea Spanish canyon has damaged the foundations of marine ecosystems by dramatically reducing seafloor biodiversity and nutrients in sediment. Increasingly, fishers around the world are taking bottom trawling further, and ...

  • Ocean floor to be cleaned as part of Tasman Bay biosecurity operation

    MAF Biosecurity New Zealand (MAFBNZ) is arranging to dredge an area of seabed in Tasman Bay early next week to reduce the risk posed by marine organisms that fell on the ocean floor during the cleaning of an oil rig there late last year. The rig, the Ocean Patriot, had been directed to remove biofouling species that had been listed as potential pests (including New Zealand's green shell mussel) ...


    By New Zealand Government

  • UN licences kick off search for underwater minerals

    The International Seabed Authority (ISA) has begun issuing exploration licences for mining the yet untouched floor of international waters raising concerns about potential environmental impacts. The licenses, issued on 21 July, grant prospecting rights for underwater minerals to private and state-owned companies from Brazil, Cook Islands, ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Hi-techs strategies reveal Europe’s underwater map at ESOF 2008

    Cold-water corals and the mud volcanoes of Europe remain a mystery to many Europeans. Despite EU waters covering an area much larger than the continent, little is known about this hidden underwater map of Europe. This knowledge gap was highlighted at the ESOF (EuroScience Open Forum) event, held on 21 July 2008 in Barcelona. “Much progress has been made in the field of marine technology in ...


    By European Science Foundation

  • New pictures reveal rich Antarctic marine life in area of rapid climate change

    New photographs of ice fish, octopus, sea pigs, giant sea spiders, rare rays and beautiful basket stars that live in Antarctica’s continental shelf seas are revealed this week by the British Antarctic Survey (BAS). As part of an international study on sea surface to seabed biodiversity a research team from across Europe, USA, Australia and South Africa onboard the BAS Royal Research Ship James ...

  • Toxicity tests improve the assessment of harbour sediment quality

    Harbour sediments should be tested for their toxic effects on living organisms in addition to being subject to the chemical, physical and biological tests usually conducted to assess water quality, according to recent research from Portugal. This would provide a better environmental assessment of dredged material to help guide port authorities’ decisions on its disposal. Under the Water ...

  • Impact of one-off dredging deposits important for licensing

    New insights into the impact of dredging on the environment highlight the distinction between small, frequent deposits of sediments arising from maintenance dredging, and larger one-off capital deposits. Understanding this distinction is crucial for effective licensing and monitoring of dredging. When sediment is removed from the bottom of a body of water and deposited elsewhere, as in dredging, ...

  • Global and China Offshore Rig Industry Report, 2011

    Offshore rig can be divided into 8 categories, i.e., drill barge, drillship, inland barge, jack-up, platform rig, semisub, submersible and tender. As of Dec.15, 2011, there had been 48 drill barges, 73 drillships, 74 inland barges, 491 jack-ups, 250 platform rigs, 210 semisubs, 5 submersibles and 40 tenders. Drillship, jack-up and semisub are the most common. As of Dec.15, 2011, there had been 54 ...


  • Monitoring heavy metal contamination in the German Wadden Sea

    Human activities, including industrial development along coastal areas, risk polluting the marine environment with heavy metals which can harm human health and aquatic life. A recent study has found elevated levels of metal pollution in the Jade area of the German Wadden Sea, but concludes that metal contamination of the sediments would not be expected to have harmful effects on the marine ...

  • AC-CESS Co Uk Ltd announces AC-ROV sales news

    Leading micro ROV manufacturer AC-CESS Co UK Ltd (Aberdeen, Scotland) has reported a number of last quarter 2008 successes with its AC-ROV Underwater Inspection System including the following: The company has achieved its first 2 sales in the Russian Federation with AC-ROV distributor Underwater Technique and Tetis Pro both of Moscow, purchasing high specification systems for undisclosed clients. ...


    By AC-CESS Co Uk Ltd

  • DEEPSEA CHALLENGE - CO2 analysis seven miles deep

    At almost seven miles down, carbon dioxide management is critical for life support. On 26th March 2012, with James Cameron at 35,756 feet under the waves on the seabed of the Mariana Trench, he and the DEEPSEA CHALLENGE team needed real-time live data on the levels of oxygen (O2), carbon dioxide (CO2), air temperature and humidity in the sub. Those four readings from a specially modified Geotech ...


    By Geotech

  • Energy Department Expands Research into Methane Hydrates, a Vast, Untapped Potential Energy Resource of the U.S.

    Today, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz announced nearly $5 million in funding across seven research projects nationwide designed to increase our understanding of methane hydrates — a large, completely untapped natural gas resource—and what it could mean for the environment, as well as American economic competiveness and energy security. “The recent boom in natural gas ...


    By US Department of Energy

  • Happy 10th Birthday James Cook

    In August 2006 the Royal Research Ship (RRS) James Cook was delivered to the National Oceanography Centre ready to carry scientists and equipment to some of Earth's most challenging environments, from tropical oceans to the edge of the ice sheets. James Cook plays a significant role in delivering ...

  • Ecological Catastrophe Overwhelms the Strait of Kerch

    A 'colossal' ecological catastrophe is growing even larger in the Strait of Kerch where at least 10 oil tankers and cargo ships loaded with sulfur were wrecked in a fierce storm on November 11. At least six sailors died in the wreckage. Now the storm in the Strait of Kerch is getting stronger, so it is not possible to stop the flow of oil into the sea and organize its collection and removal. ...

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