snowfall measurement News

  • Weather Analytics Releases Worldwide Historic, Current and Seven-Day Forecast Snowfall Conditions

    Weather Analytics today announced the launch of a new snowfall climate variable – capable of capturing historical and current snowfall conditions and predicting future snowfall for any area in the world – hour by hour – up to seven days in advance. Available by special order, snowfall variable data is updated on an hourly basis with new information obtained by the National ...


    By Weather Analytics

  • NASA Cold Weather Airborne Campaign to Measure Falling Snow

    Beginning Jan. 17, NASA will fly an airborne science laboratory above Canadian snowstorms to tackle a difficult challenge facing the upcoming Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) satellite mission -- measuring snowfall from space. GPM is an international satellite ...

  • Snowy Arizona?

    Jerry Madero loves living in sun-drenched Cornville, Arizona. He particularly liked it one morning in February when he got up early enough to capture this shot of his snowy backyard! "Measurable snow is a rare event here in Cornville, and it melts very fast so I had to shoot this photo at dawn to capture what was left of about a 0.7 inch snowfall that happened during the early morning ...


    By Davis Instruments Corp.

  • Industrial pollutant melted European glaciers

    Industrial emissions of black carbon were responsible for the retreat of the glaciers in the European Alps that marked the end of the so-called ‘Little Ice Age’, according to a new study. The researchers explain how black carbon deposits could have caused glaciers to melt more rapidly from the mid-19th century and suggest that human activities were already having a visible influence ...

  • USGS & NOAA collaborate with Canada on climate data

    The US Geological Survey is joining with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Environment Canada (EC) in jointly operating and calibrating high-tech climate monitoring stations. NOAA recently installed a U.S. Climate Reference Network sensor in Egbert, Ontario, while EC set up a Canadian Reference Climate Station at the USGS Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) ...

  • Paul O’Gorman: Extreme storm tracker

    Original story at MIT News Several winters back, while shoveling out his driveway after a particularly heavy snowstorm, Paul O’Gorman couldn’t help but wonder: How is climate change affecting the Boston region’s biggest snow events? The question wasn’t an idle one for O’Gorman: For the past ...

  • Local changes in Bulgarian climate could have widespread impacts

    Southwest Bulgaria has an unusual climate with Mediterranean temperatures in the summer and cold winters. New research indicates that there will be an increase in annual mean temperature in this region and suggests that climatic changes could have damaging environmental and socio-economic impacts. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has reported that the global average annual ...

  • Lasers from space show thinning of Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets

    The most comprehensive picture of the rapidly thinning glaciers along the coastline of both the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets has been created using satellite lasers. The findings are an important step forward in the quest to make more accurate predictions for future sea level rise. Reporting this week in the journal Nature researchers from British Antarctic Survey and the University of ...

  • Uncertain water availability

    In the wake of a recent controversy over the retreat of Himalayan glaciers, in which the UN's climate science body admitted that the assertion they would disappear by 2035 was an error, water availability has emerged as a key issue of even greater uncertainty. Receding Himalayan glaciers grabbed headlines because they feed major rivers in South Asia and some parts of Southeast Asia, home to a ...

  • NASA: Vast Areas of West Antarctica Melted in 2005

    PASADENA, California (ENS) - A team of NASA and university scientists has found clear evidence that extensive areas of snow melted in west Antarctica in January 2005 in response to warm temperatures. Combined, the affected regions encompassed an area as big as California. This was the first widespread Antarctic melting ever detected with NASA's QuikScat satellite and the most significant melt ...

  • Pakistan expands glacier monitoring network

    Pakistan is expanding its glacier monitoring network into the higher Himalayas to better assess climate change impacts  in the upper Indus basin and related flood hazards. The International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), Kathmandu, helped the Pakistan Meteorological ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Baltic Sea faces a tough future

    The Baltic Sea is likely to be warmer, lower in oxygen and more acidic in the future, warn Swedish scientists in a recent study. Current strategies for managing the Sea will need to change if they are to meet marine protection objectives. Serious environmental problems are already clear in the Baltic Sea: pollution, overfishing and eutrophication are some well-known issues. According to the ...

  • Indo-French satellite to boost climate insight

    A newly launched Indo-French satellite will help scrutinise weather over the tropics in detail and permit better understanding of the monsoon, cyclones and floods. The one-tonne ‘Megha-Tropiques’ (Megha means cloud in Sanskrit) was launched along with three other smaller satellites on an ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Global Land Temperatures Warmest Ever in January, April

    GENEVA, Switzerland, August 8, 2007 (ENS) - Global land surface temperatures for January and April will likely be ranked as the warmest since recordkeeping began in 1880, the United Nations World Meteorological Organization reported Tuesday. 'Weather and climate are marked by record extremes in many regions across the world since January 2007,' the WMO said.The global weather ...

  • ESRL scientists study California’s water future in a changing climate

    Water security is never far from the mind of any decision maker in the U.S. West— but it’s not a terrorist attack on a dam or canal that triggers the most anxiety, it’s climate change. This fall, California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger called his state’s water troubles a “holy water war” pitting “north versus south, California versus the feds, rural versus urban....” And well known challenges— the ...

  • California first to feel hydro-power crunch of drought

    Flying over the Sierra Nevada as California entered its fourth year of drought, the state's energy chief looked down and saw stark bare granite cloaked in dirty brown haze - not the usual pristine white peaks heaped with snow that would run the state's hydroelectric dams for the year. Spring is arriving with the Pacific Northwest measuring near record-low-snowfall, and much of the rest of the ...


    By Associated Press

  • New study: climate change threatening Glacier National Park could harm Montana`s future tourism and economy

    The last decade in Glacier National Park saw exactly double the temperature increase for the planet as a whole. The effects of this warming threaten Glacier National Park’s resources, from glaciers and snow-capped mountains to wildlife and forests, as well as the Montana jobs and tourism revenue the park generates, according to a new report from the Rocky Mountain Climate Organization (RMCO) and ...

  • Environment Agency builds new technology into rain monitoring network

    During recent trials conducted by the Environment Agency (EA) and the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA), in cooperation with the UK Met Office, OTT Hydrometry’s Pluvio2 raingauge exceeded the target performance requirements of the assessment and over 100 units have now been purchased by the EA. As a result, the quality of monitoring data will be improved and the cost of running ...

  • Antarctic ice loss dangerously fast

    New studies show that the Antarctic ice sheet is melting faster than previously anticipated. If this jump is indicative of a trend due to global warming the entire antarctic ecology could be threatened much sooner than expected. In a first-of-its-kind study, an international team led by Eric Rignot of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., and the University of California, Irvine, ...

  • Glaciers have moved together in far-flung regions

    A new study adds evidence that climate swings in Europe and North America during the last ice age were closely linked to changes in the tropics. The study, published this week in the journal Science, suggests that a prolonged cold spell that sent glaciers in Europe and North America creeping forward several hundred years ago may have affected climate patterns as far south as Peru, causing ...

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