soil microorganism News

  • Silver nanoparticles in sewage sludge harmful to soil microorganisms

    Recent research has found that silver nanoparticles in sewage sludge, which is used on agricultural land as a fertiliser, can be toxic to soil microorganisms. The researchers calculated that a maximum of 30mg of silver nanoparticles per kilogram of sludge can be applied to land before harm occurs, based on typical application rates in Germany of five tons per hectare of farmland every three ...

  • Soil microorganisms help prevent non-target effects of pesticides

    A new study has investigated the properties of different types of soils which can cause pesticides to cling on to soil and prevent them from affecting non-target species. It demonstrates that microorganisms can play an important role in binding pesticides to soil. Microbial levels can therefore help indicate how much pesticide is freely available in soil. Pesticides applied during agricultural ...

  • Microorganisms in the Ground Don’t Slack Off in Winter

    It is known that soil microorganisms can maintain some activity during the cold winter months. Scientist at Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) and Umeå University in Sweden have now shown that the microorganisms in frozen soils are much more viable than previously anticipated and also has large potential for growth. In northern forest ecosystems, there is a great deal of ...


    By ScienceDaily

  • Scientists work to plug microorganisms into the energy grid

    Researchers of the University of Seville and IRNASE (Institute of Natural Resources and Agrobiology), of the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) have verified in controlled trials the efficiency of Erica andevalensis, or heather from Andévalo -- an endemic shrub from the province of Huelva and the Portuguese area of the Alentejo -- in the recovery of soils contaminated with heavy ...


    By ScienceDaily

  • NREL Explains the Higher Cellulolytic Activity of a Vital Microorganism

    Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) say better understanding of a bacterium could lead to cheaper production of cellulosic ethanol and other advanced biofuels. Their discovery was made during an investigation into the performance of Clostridium thermocellum. The scientists found the microorganism utilizes the ...

  • Soil climate monitoring in Antarctica

    Antarctica, the coldest place on earth, has an area of about 14 million sq. km. About 98% of the continent is covered by ice, which averages about 2100 m thick. This vast ice sheet contains the earth’s largest fresh water reserve. Of the ice-free ground, only 0.3% is available for soils to form. Currently there are seven soil climate stations in Antarctica, which monitor a range of ambient ...

  • Smithsonian exhibition reveals impact of soil

    Starting on Saturday, October 2, visitors to The Durham Museum will enjoy a journey into the skin of the earth and explore the amazing world of soils in the new exhibition, Dig It! The Secrets of Soil. Completely familiar yet largely unknown, soils help sustain virtually every form of life on Earth. Still, it is said that we know more about the dark side of the moon than we do about the Earth ...

  • Soil – the living skin of planet earth

    The soil forms the outer skin of the land masses of Planet Earth. This thin veneer of living material is sometimes only a few centimetres thick and rarely thicker than two or three metres, but it has critical influence on what happens on the surface of the Earth. Soil is our life-support system. It provides anchorage for roots; holds water long enough for plants to make use of it; and holds ...

  • Characterising the biodiversity and functioning of European soils

    World Soil Day (Dec 5, 2014) concludes a week-long series of events in Dijon bringing together international scientists. The results of the European EcoFINDERS project, coordinated by INRA, were revealed for the occasion. This project helped create standardised methods of measuring soil biodiversity, and as a result, vital data on the health of Europe’s soils were gathered. The analyses ...

  • Do nanoparticles affect the health of the soil ecosystem?

    New research reveals that many microorganisms, including bacteria and protozoa, show little sensitivity to fullerene nanoparticles applied to soil samples. However, fast-growing bacteria decreased in number and the genetic diversity of bacteria and protozoa altered slightly. This could affect the bottom of the food chain, which may have long-term implications for the overall health of the soil ...

  • Sophisticated soil analysis for improved land use

    Soil variation occurs across multiple geographic scales ranging from vast climatic regions of the Earth to a 50 acre farm field to the molecular world of soil nano-particles in a pinch of soil. For example, in a forest or an agricultural field, soil properties vary from the summit of a hill down to the base. Within a single soil aggregate that may be less than a quarter inch in diameter, there ...

  • Solvay hails French soil remediation conference a success

    The 'Focused remedies for a well-managed remediation' conference was held in the Soda Ash plant at Dombasle, in which the Solution Unit Soil Remediation played an important role. Organised by SFGP, the French Society of Process Engineering,  GISFI, the French Scientific Interest Group, Industrial Brownfields, and CAPEMM, the Meurthe and Mosel Development Agency, its objectives were to promote ...


    By Solvay Soil Remediation

  • NEIKER is studying the impact of climate change on the soil ecosystem

    The Basque Institute for Agricultural Research and Development NEIKER-Tecnalia has had a Microbial Observatory in the Ordesa and Monte Perdido National Nature Reserve (Huesca Pyrenees) since 2011. Its purpose is to evaluate the impact of climate change on the ecosystems of the soil by monitoring its microbial properties over time. The research areas are located at altitudes of between 1,500 and ...

  • Biogenie Inaugurates a Soil Treatment Facility in Yellowknife

    Yellowknife, October 11, 2006 – Biogenie, a company which is specialized in the remediation of contaminated sites, recently inaugurated a contaminated Soil Treatment Facility (STF) on the premises of Yellowknife’s municipal landfill site. Built under a partnership approach with the City of Yellowknife, the STF will improve the contaminated soil management practices at the landfill site while ...

  • Household compost as good for soil as conventional fertilisers, say EU researchers

    Since 2005, conventional disposal of organic waste has been prohibited in Sweden. Instead, this waste is incinerated or separated at source, processed (composted or anaerobically digested) and recycled as fertiliser on crop land. A new study has investigated the use of organic waste from different sources as a fertiliser and found that residue from biogas production is an effective fertiliser. ...

  • Constructed wetlands help keep farmland soil out of rivers

    Small, artificial wetlands can reduce river pollution by trapping soil and nutrients swept off agricultural land by rainfall, a recent study finds. The researchers recommend that they are used as a back-up option to soil management measures also designed to reduce runoff into rivers. Intensive agriculture can degrade and erode soil, allowing it to be washed into streams and rivers. This pollutes ...

  • 3D printed soil reveals the world beneath our feet

    Soil scientists at Abertay University are using 3D printing technology to find out, for the very first time, exactly what is going on in the world beneath our feet. In the same way that ecologists study the interactions of living organisms above ground, Professor Wilfred Otten and researchers at the university’sSIMBIOS ...

  • Northern US soil carbon reservoirs vulnerable to global warming, says USGS

    Mounting evidence shows that soil carbon is increasingly contributing larger amounts of carbon dioxide (CO2) to the atmosphere as a result of warming, permafrost degradation, and complex climate-biogeochemical interactions. Northern soils are known to harbor large amounts of carbon in the zone between the moss surface and the permafrost or mineral soil boundary. USGS Soil Scientist, Jennifer ...

  • Q&A about national general survey on soil contamination in China

    MEP and MLR announced the report on the national general survey on soil contamination today, and the survey results showed the general condition of the soil environment across the country not optimistic; some areas are suffering from bad soil pollution, the environmental quality of the arable land is worrying, and there are pressing soil environmental problems in industrial and mining deserted ...

  • Harmful polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons removed from soil using wastewater sludge and polyacrylamide

    Wastewater sludge is widely used to remove toxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from soil, and yet the mechanisms underlying this process remain unclear. A new study reveals the extent of PAH removal following different treatments, and could provide a useful resource for those looking to diminish the effects that these pollutants have both on people and on the environment. PAHs have been ...

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