soil mixing News

  • BAUER Maschinen GmbH and RTG Rammtechnik GmbH introduce new soil mixing tool (SCM-DH)

    Different soil mixing techniques have been in operation for many years. When mixing cement slurry into loose or soft, non-load-bearing subsoil, the load-bearing capacity of the subsoil increases and the settlement is reduced. For this purpose, the BAUER Group offers several types of equipment and processes which are also suitable for the construction of cut-off and load-bearing retaining walls ...


    By BAUER Resources GmbH

  • Environmental sound barriers: a mixed blessing

    Busy roads have major impacts on the environment of surrounding areas, with noise pollution from traffic being one of the biggest problems. Building sound barriers alongside the road is a common way to minimise such noise. A recent study highlights the benefits and disadvantages of sound barriers. Earth mounds, fences or walls are frequently constructed as sound barriers alongside busy roads and ...

  • MIXED IN-SITU & EX-SITU PROJECT SUCCESS

    Envirotreat Ltd have recently undertaken remedial works at an operating gas governor station to the north of Manchester (UK), that had previously used as a full gas production facility. The voluntary remediation project formed part of the comprehensive programme being undertaken by the Client at a number of old gas production sites across the North West of England. The first phase of the ...


  • Absorbing organic pollutants in soils

    A new study closely examines the role degrading plant materials play in absorbing organic pollutants in the soil. These “biopolymers” are the waxy, water resistant barriers between the plant cells and the environment. This information is important to evaluate the role of these biopolymers as a natural sorbent for organic pollutants in the environment. The study, reported in the ...

  • Oil and water don’t mix – but can they co-exist?

    Real progress is being made to reduce the environmental impact of oil sands activities. But that message is being lost in the flood of bad press about contamination of adjacent waterways and concerns about those ugly tailings ponds. Oil and water don't mix. But can they co-exist? August has not been a good month for the Alberta oil sands industry. The tidal wave of bad news that flooded the media ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Predicting amount of oil in contaminated soils

    Scientists are reporting a new technique for mapping and testing oil-contaminated soils. Traditionally, samples need to be collected from the field and returned to a lab for extensive chemical analysis, costing time and money when neither is readily available during a clean-up operation. The new method can take measurements in the field and accurately predict the total amount of petroleum ...

  • Mixed crop-livestock farming could help adaptation in Africa

    According to new research, African farms with both crops and livestock could be more resilient to climate change than farms that only grow crops. The research suggests that policy makers should support farmers in making the switch to integrated farming. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has indicated that agriculture in tropical under-developed countries is the most vulnerable ...

  • Basin wetlands checked for acid sulfate soils

    More than 1000 wetlands throughout the Murray-Darling Basin are being assessed to determine the risk posed to them by acid sulfate soils, the Murray-Darling Basin Commission (MDBC) announced today. Chief Executive Dr Wendy Craik AM said the MDBC was funding the project which is being carried out by State agencies, the Murray-Darling Freshwater Research Centre, CSIRO, Southern Cross University and ...


    By Australian Government

  • Free Soil Testing For Accurate Fertiliser Application

    With the growing season nearly upon us, Welsh farmers are being given an opportunity to discover the benefits of soil analysis through a number of free soil testing workshops at Farming Connect. Regular soil testing enables farmers to adopt a targeted approach to fertiliser use, thus providing significant cost savings, according to Lisa Roberts of Farming Connect. Soil analysis also identifies ...


    By ENDURAMAXX

  • Farmers Urged to Check Soil – Liquid Fertiliser Tanks

    Farmers and growers were advised to check their soil, according to the Darlington and Stockton Times, to check their soil phosphate and Potash levels.  A decline in levels has been reported due to the decline in use of the two treatments that have fallen by an estimated 40 per cent as a direct result of rising prices in 2008. Many farmers have been reported to have taken phosphate and potash ...


    By ENDURAMAXX

  • Soil Association response to Defra on food security in the UK

    In response to a Defra discussion paper titled, “Ensuring the UK’s food security in a changing world”, Patrick Holden, Soil Association director, said: “Credit to Hilary Benn for joining the debate that has been live amongst far-sighted individuals and food and farming groups for years. But the dead-hand of the Treasury is still visible on the document – with its outdated economic mantra of ...


    By Soil Association

  • Soil carbon storage is not always influenced by tillage practices

    The practice of no-till has increased considerably during the past 20 yr. Soils under no-till usually host a more abundant and diverse biota and are less prone to erosion, water loss, and structural breakdown than tilled soils. Their organic matter content is also often increased and consequently, no-till is proposed as a measure to mitigate the increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide ...

  • Food security depends on sustainable nutrient management of soils

    Food security is being threatened by loss of soil nutrients that are essential for the high yield of crops. A recent study outlines strategies to ensure the sustainable production of food through a holistic approach to soil nutrient management. In response to the rising demand for food from an increasing world population, high-yielding crops are being grown with the help of artificial fertilisers ...

  • Longtime soil science publication repositioned and relaunched

    The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) is pleased to announce one of the leading soil science publications, Soil Survey Horizons, has undergone an editorial repositioning and name change as of 2012.  The new title, Soil Horizons, is consistent with SSSA’s desire to reach a wider audience, including policy-makers in Washington, environmental scientists and researchers, and the ...

  • Willow trees are cost-efficient cleaners of contaminated soil

    Using broad-leaved trees such as willow trees in the phytoremediation of contaminated soils constitutes a cost-efficient method for restoring mining areas and landfills, according to a research project led by the University of Eastern Finland. Funded by the EU, the project studied willow tree growth in contaminated soils in Finland and Russia. "This is a cost-efficient solution for ...

  • Silver nanoparticles in sewage sludge harmful to soil microorganisms

    Recent research has found that silver nanoparticles in sewage sludge, which is used on agricultural land as a fertiliser, can be toxic to soil microorganisms. The researchers calculated that a maximum of 30mg of silver nanoparticles per kilogram of sludge can be applied to land before harm occurs, based on typical application rates in Germany of five tons per hectare of farmland every three ...

  • New reference material for hexavalent chromium in contaminated soil

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has issued a new standard—a certified reference material—to aid in the detection and measurement of the potent carcinogen hexavalent chromium in soil. Developed in collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (NJDEP), the new reference material will provide a crucial ...

  • Shifts in soil bacteria linked to wetland restoration success

    A new study led by Duke University researchers finds that restoring degraded wetlands -- especially those that had been converted into farm fields -- actually decreases their soil bacterial diversity. But that’s a good thing, say the study’s authors, because it marks a return to the wetland soils’ natural conditions.“It sounds counter-intuitive, but our study shows that in restored wetlands, ...


    By Duke University

  • Hanford tank may be leaking waste into soil

    An underground tank holding some of the worst radioactive waste at the nation's most contaminated nuclear site might be leaking into the soil. The U.S. Energy Department said workers at Washington state's Hanford Nuclear Reservation detected higher radioactivity levels under tank AY-102 during a routine inspection Thursday. Spokeswoman Lori ...


    By Associated Press

  • ASTM D7762 - 11 Standard Practice for Design of Stabilization of Soil and Soil-Like Materials with Self-Cementing Fly Ash

    Self-cementing coal fly ashes are suitable materials for the stabilization of soils, recycled pavement materials and road surface gravel. Fly ash stabilization can result in improved properties, including increased stiffness, strength and freeze-thaw durability; reduced hydraulic conductivity, plasticity, and swelling; and increased control of soil compressibility ...


    By ASTM International

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