toxicity study News

  • Oceanographers discover toxic algae

    Louisiana State University, USA, researchers Sibel Bargu and Ana Garcia (Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences) have discovered toxic algae in vast, remote regions of the open ocean for the first time. The recent findings are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). Harmful algal blooms (HABs) are reported as increasing both geographically and in ...

  • Testing the toxicity of nanomaterials

    When the properties of materials are not fully understood, as with nanomaterials, how can they be adequately tested? A new study has found that two commonly-manufactured nanomaterials can damage human DNA. This highlights the need to evaluate the risks they might pose and design appropriate safety tests. Materials that damage DNA can cause human cells to mutate, which can eventually lead to ...

  • Toxic compounds in groundwater

    Research is being conducted on degrading a toxic compound found in groundwater systems around the world Vinyl chloride is a cancer-causing compound formed from solvents in groundwater systems under anaerobic conditions. These solvents are used in many industrial applications around the world and often belong to the most encountered groundwater pollutants in industrialized countries. Groundwater ...

  • Cleansing toxic waste – with vinegar

    Engineers and environmental scientists at the University of Leeds are developing methods of helping contaminated water to clean itself by adding simple organic chemicals such as vinegar. The harmful chromium compounds found in the groundwater at sites receiving waste from former textiles factories, smelters, and tanneries have been linked to cancer, and excessive exposure can lead to problems ...


    By University of Leeds

  • Computing toxic chemicals

    A new computational method for working out in advance whether a chemical will be toxic will be reporting in a forthcoming issue of the International Journal of Data Mining and Bioinformatics. There is increasing pressure on the chemical and related industries to ensure that their products comply with increasing numbers of safety regulations. Providing regulators, intermediary users and consumers ...


    By Inderscience Publishers

  • Mangroves can trap toxic heavy metals, says study

    Researchers in New Caledonia have discovered that mangrove forests act as useful filters for toxic heavy metals, preventing these pollutants from contaminating the islands' waterways. The researchers — from France's Institute of Development Research (IRD), working in collaboration with regional research partners — say that ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Mercury-resistant bacteria useful for studying toxic metal cycling

    Mercury-resistant bacteria could help scientists to understand more about mercury cycling in the environment. In a new study, researchers identified one particular strain of soil bacterium that could serve as a model for the conversion of the toxic metal into less toxic forms. They also discovered a new gene involved in the conversion process. Bacteria play an important role in the cycling of ...

  • Pelletized manure reduces Toxic runoff

    There is considerable amount of uncertainty concerning the environmental impacts that animal hormones have on surface water. Higher concentrations of hormones in waterways have been found to cause physiological and sexual impairment in fish and other aquatic species. However, a study from the University of Delaware that examined estrogen concentrations runoff from agricultural fields fertilized ...

  • Toxic-free Ontario - CELA releases toxic use reduction model law

    The Canadian Environmental Law Association (CELA) has released its model toxic use reduction law. For the past year CELA has worked with other environmental, health and worker groups to frame a model law to reduce our use and reliance on toxic substances in manufacturing, workplaces and consumer products in Ontario. 'Concerned parents, workers, and consumers in Ontario support widespread ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • Government finally acts on toxic Bisphenol A

    The government of Canada is prepared to declare that Bisphenol A (BPA), a chemical commonly found in plastic baby bottles, reusable water bottles and the lining of some food cans should be classified as "toxic" under Canadian law. Although it is a bold move, the government is lagging behind business, where many have already removed BPA products from their shelves. The government has ...


    By GLOBE Foundation

  • How toxic are unregulated wastewater pollutants?

    Spanish and Dutch researchers have evaluated the environmental impact of chemical pollutants in wastewater in Spain. The results suggest that the most problematic pollutants may be derived from newer pharmaceutical and personal care products, such as everyday painkillers and soaps, not yet regulated. Water pollution is the main environmental concern for EU citizens, according to an EC ...

  • LEED Homes May Not Be Less Toxic

    EMSL Analytical offers LEED testing solutions for both new and existing commercial and residential properties. Cinnaminson, NJ, July 14th, 2010 Environmental and ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • Are Toxic Chemicals in Your Gardening Tools?

    Testing shows that many common gardening tools—including hoses, gloves, kneeling pads, shovels, and trowels—are contaminated with harmful chemicals, claims the nonprofit environmental group Ecology Center. CNN reports that the organization analyzed 200 popular gardening products and found that two-thirds of them contained significant levels of phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA), and lead. ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • Pesticide endosulfan ruled “highly toxic”

    An international scientific review committee ruled last week that endosulfan, a widely used pesticide, is highly toxic to humans and wildlife. The ruling concludes debate on whether the chemical should be classified as a persistent organic pollutant (POP), a decision that could result in a global ban. 'Thankfully the science - rather than political and economic interests - has been at the fore, ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • FEMA`s Toxic Trailers Exposed

    WASHINGTON, DC, July 25, 2007 (ENS) - The Sierra Club is declaring a partial victory in its fight with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, FEMA, over toxic formaldehyde found in some of the 120,000 mobile homes and travel trailers provided to hurricane survivors left homeless in 2005 by Katrina and Rita. In response to a public outcry by the Sierra Club and others, FEMA has decided to ...

  • EPA announces $3.3 million settlement with DuPont for failure to report Toxic chemical studies (HQ)

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today announced that DuPont has agreed to pay a penalty of $3.3 million to resolve 57 Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) violations. DuPont failed to immediately notify EPA of research indicating substantial risk found during testing chemicals for possible use as surface protection, masonry protection, water repellants, sealants and paints. The ...

  • EPA study of toxic air pollution near Elizabeth, NJ Middle school finds air pollutants below levels of concern

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced that a seven-month study of toxic air pollution outside the Mabel Holmes Middle School in Elizabeth, New Jersey did not find pollution levels of concern. From August 2009 to January 2010, EPA monitored the air for acetaldehyde, benzene, nickel and other metals, which are toxic air pollutants commonly associated with industrial facilities, ...

  • Scientists convene to discuss new method to study how toxic chemicals impact human health

    More than 200 scientists, regulators, and policy makers from around the world convened recently at EPA’s first ToxCast Data Analysis Summit to discuss results of the first phase of ToxCast.  ToxCast is an innovative approach for profiling how chemicals in our environment impact important biological pathways that are critical for the function of the body’s systems such as the heart, lungs, brain ...

  • Microorganisms in toxic groundwater fine-tuned to survive

    Microorganisms can indeed live in extreme environments, but the ones that do are highly adapted to survive and little else, according to a collaboration that includes Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Joint Genome Institute (JGI) and the University of Oklahoma. The metagenomic study of a 'stressed' microbial community in groundwater near a former waste disposal pond site on ...


    By ScienceDaily

  • Toxics Persist in Washington Rivers, Lakes and Fish

    OLYMPIA, Washington - Toxic chemicals banned decades ago continue to linger in the environment and concentrate in the food chain, threatening people and the environment, according to three recent studies by the Washington state Department of Ecology. The new data on toxic contaminants in freshwater fish and sediments add evidence to the state's push to reduce and eliminate the use of toxic ...

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