toxins test News

  • Improved cholera toxin detection

    With cholera on the rampage in Haiti and almost 40 other countries, scientists have reported the development of a key advancement that could provide a fast, simple test to detect the toxin which causes the disease. Details are published in the American Chemical Society’s journal Bioconjugate Chemistry.Cholera affects more than 200,000 people annually, mainly in developing countries, and ...

  • Cholera toxin nanoparticle detector

    A complex sugar may become one of the most effective weapons to stop the spread of cholera, a disease that has claimed thousands of lives in Haiti since the devastating earthquake last year. A technique developed by University of Central Florida scientists would allow relief workers to test water sources for contamination with the cholera toxin. In the test, the sugar dextran is coated onto iron ...

  • Protozoa detect water toxins

    Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) biologist Scott Gallager has grand plans for his revolutionary Swimming Behavioural Spectrophotometer (SBS), which employs one-celled protozoa to detect toxins in water sources. The SBS has been selected as a 2010 ‘Better World\' technology by the Association of University Technology Managers. This success story was actually a concept which the US ...

  • Toxins Discovered on Sierra Nevada Trails

    LA Testing provides testing solutions for abandoned mines and industrial sites to protect people and the environment from toxic hazards. Los Alamitos, CA, July 21st, 2010 Last month the nonprofit organization, The Sierra Fund, released a report entitled Gold Country Recreational Trails and Abandoned Mines.  The report was delivered on the steps of California’s State ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • Electronic nose sniffs out toxins

    Imagine a polka-dotted postage stamp-sized sensor that can sniff out some known poisonous gases and toxins and show the results simply by changing colors. Support for the development and application of this electronic nose comes from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health. The new technology is discussed in this month’s issue of Nature ...

  • Cheap paper nano-sensor detects water toxins

    Scientists have used nanotechnology to turn paper into a sensor that can detect toxins in drinking water. The China–US team dipped normal filter paper into a solution containing carbon nanotubes — which can conduct electricity — and antibodies to microcystin-LR, a common and dangerous toxin. They dried the paper and repeated the process until enough nanotubes were present to render it ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Are Toxins in Your Driveway Sealant Creating a Health Risk?

    A freshly sealed asphalt driveway or parking lot provides a deep black appearance that looks attractive to property owners and can help to extend the life of the asphalt. These pavement sealers are often made up of a mixture of sand, clay, polymers, water and either asphalt or coal tar. Pavement sealers that contain coal tar have come under increased scrutiny in recent years due to ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • EPA plans new toxin guidelines for drinking water

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency plans to come out with new guidelines that will give cities and water treatment plants a blueprint for dealing with the type of algae-borne toxin that contaminated the drinking water in Ohio's fourth-largest city, a federal official said Wednesday. A new health advisory is on target to be finalized sometime next spring, said Peter Grevatt, director of the ...


    By Associated Press

  • Modified plant clears up deadly water toxin

    Plants may be a useful tool in clearing water of harmful toxins produced by blue-green algae, new research indicates. Some blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) — which grow in warm, nutrient-rich waters  — produce toxins that can severely damage the liver or nervous system. The effects of the toxins range from a mild illness to rapid death. They can remain in water supplies after the algae have been ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Lead and Other Toxins Found in Children’s Jewelry at Walmart and Other Retailers

    New research, conducted by the Michigan-based nonprofit Ecology Center, has discovered high levels of toxic substances in many pieces of children’s costume jewelry that are sold in Walmart and other retailers. The products contained unsafe levels of lead, as well as other dangerous metals such as arsenic, chromium and nickel.   Researchers at the Ecology Center tested 99 unique ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • Mid-Atlantic IAQ Expert Identifies Microbial Toxins in Indoor Environments

    For many people who have been unfortunate to discover mold in their homes, school or office they often think of allergies and asthma.  Few people realize that many types of mold can also produce powerful toxins known as mycotoxins.  In fact, more than 200 mycotoxins have been identified from common molds, and many more will likely be discovered.   A mycotoxin is a toxic secondary ...

  • Illinois IAQ Consultant Helps Identify Microbial Toxins in People’s Homes

    Mold contamination in an indoor environment can result from flooding, plumbing leaks, elevated humidity levels and due to water incursions from rain.  When people discover water damage in their properties they need to be aware that mold can begin to grow in as short as 24 hours in many circumstances.   Many people are aware that elevated levels of mold in indoor environments can lead to ...


    By Cochrane & Associates, LLC

  • Toxins from Iron King Mine have Dewey-Humboldt Residents Concerned

    Environmental testing solutions for abandoned mines include testing for hazardous waste, toxins, particulates and groundwater contamination.  All of these analyses are available from LA Testing. Los Alamitos, CA, May 19th, 2010. The Iron King Mine and Humboldt Smelter encompass over 300 acres on the outskirts of the Central Arizona town of Dewey-Humboldt.  Although it has been decades ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • Microbial Toxins May be Present after a Flood or Sewage Backup

    When people discover that flooding or a sanitary sewer overflow has damaged their home of business the first thing people often think about is having the property cleaned as quickly as possible.� These types of flooding events can be devastating to families and businesses. The mess left behind is not only unsightly, but can harbor a host of microbial pathogens and even microbial ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • IAQ and Remediation Professionals Protect the Public from Microbial Toxins

    Earlier this month, residents of Commerce City in Colorado woke up to discover raw sewage in about 40 homes.  The mess occurred after a water main broke which flooded the local sewage system.    According to a local news report, the insurance adjuster has stated that the water main break was an act of Mother Nature so the County Water District is not responsible for the damaged ...

  • Sewage Contamination in Buildings can Expose People to Microbial Toxins

    California residents are used to hearing about beach closures due to sewage spills and high bacteria counts in the water off of the state’s famous beaches.  Raw sewage can contain a host of potentially harmful substances, including: viruses, bacteria, protozoa, parasites, and fungi.   Just as health professionals take sewage in the beaches serious, people who have experienced a ...


    By Clark Seif Clark Inc.

  • Toxins leaking from 2nd pipe at NC coal ash dump

    North Carolina officials said Tuesday that groundwater containing unsafe levels of arsenic apparently leaching from a Duke Energy coal ash dump is still pouring into the Dan River, which is already contaminated from a massive Feb. 2 spill. The state Department of Environment and Natural Resources ordered Duke to stop the flow of ...


    By Associated Press

  • San Francisco Residents Voice Concerns over Toxins from Hunters Point Shipyard

    Hunters Point Shipyard was a heavily used naval base from 1941 until 1974.  When the base was closed the property was leased to a large machine shop.  Today, the property is being given a new lease on life by a major property development firm.   The redevelopment promises new productive use of the land, but many area residents have major concerns.  These concerns were brought ...


    By Cochrane & Associates, LLC

  • EPA Issues Health Advisories to Protect Americans from Algal Toxins in Drinking Water

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) today issued health advisory values that states and utilities can use to protect Americans from elevated levels of algal toxins in drinking water. Algal blooms in rivers, lakes, and bays sometimes produce harmful toxins. Because utilities often use these water bodies as sources of drinking water, EPA has determined algal toxin levels in tap water ...

  • Testing for Styrene is becoming increasingly important in the workplace

    The US Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) states that human exposure to high levels of styrene may induce adverse nervous system effects.Styrene, also known as vinyl benzene, as well as numerous other names, is an organic compound found in many manufacturing processes. Under normal conditions, this aromatic hydrocarbon is an oily liquid. It evaporates easily and has a sweet ...


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