uranium mining pond cover News

  • U.S. EPA settlements require investigation of uranium contamination on Southwestern tribal lands (AZ, NM)

    This week the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency entered into two enforcement actions, both of which will contribute towards cleaning up uranium contamination at the Navajo Nation and Hopi Reservation. In one settlement, Rio Algom Mining LLC, a subsidiary of Canadian corporation BHP Billiton, has agreed to control releases of radium (a decay product of uranium) from the Quivira Mine Site, near ...

  • Nevada mine pollution deal brings residents $19.5M

    Rural neighbors of an abandoned World War II-era copper mine that has leaked toxic chemicals in northern Nevada for decades have won up to a $19.5 million settlement from companies they accused of covering up the contamination. Atlantic Richfield Co. and its parent BP America Inc. acknowledged no wrongdoing under the agreement, which also calls for them to pay $2.6 million in attorney fees to the ...


    By Associated Press

  • Sandoval: Nevada needs more time on mine Superfund status

    Facing a deadline set by federal regulators, Gov. Brian Sandoval said Friday the state needs more time to decide whether to end its long-held opposition to having an abandoned Nevada mine listed among the nation's most contaminated sites. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency officials notified Sandoval last month that if they didn't hear from him by Friday, they'd formally propose placing ...


    By Associated Press

  • ARCO pays US$2.7m to contain waste at old copper mine

    The Atlantic Richfield Company, ARCO, has been ordered to reimburse the federal government US$2.77 million for work already performed to clean up abandoned wastes from the Anaconda copper mine that are contaminating air and water in central Nevada. The order issued by the US Environmental Protection Agency also requires ARCO to fund and develop a plan for a technical assistance program to ...

  • Nuclear power: bruised but not broken

    Earlier this month, an explosion in the energy sector caused immense destruction, costing the lives of more than 40 people ... but most of us barely noticed it. The deaths of the coal miners, up to 4,000 feet below ground in western Pakistan, were eclipsed by the international attention given to the crisis in another energy sector — nuclear power — as engineers working in the ...


    By SciDev.Net

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