urban pollution News

  • Urban greening reduces noise pollution

    Green roofs have the potential to significantly reduce road traffic noise in the urban environment, according to a new study. The results suggest that greening of roofs and walls with materials suitable for growing plants softens the urban environment keeping sound levels low, whereas hard, manmade structures tend to amplify traffic noise. The Environmental Noise Directive (2002/49/EC)1 ...

  • New Study Links Urban Pollutants to Parkinson’s Disease

    EMSL Analytical offers environmental testing services to protect people from exposure to pollutants and hazardous materials. Cinnaminson, NJ, Scientists at the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis recently analyzed data from 35,000 patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease.  The findings, published in the “American Journal of Epidemiology,” examined data ...


    By EMSL Analytical, Inc.

  • International Urban Transport Pollution and Modelling Conference in Tianjin, 8 December 2016

    Hazardous smog is a very serious issue in China and currently a focus of great attention. CERC's Managing Director Dr. David Carruthers gave keynote presentations at the International Urban Transport Pollution and Modelling conference in Tianjin on the 8th December 2016. The conference was hosted by the Department of Environmental Science of Nankai University, with ...

  • International Urban Transport Pollution and Modelling Conference in Tianjin, 8 December 2016

    Hazardous smog is a very serious issue in China and currently a focus of great attention. CERC's Managing Director Dr. David Carruthers gave keynote presentations at the International Urban Transport Pollution and Modelling conference in Tianjin on the 8th December 2016. The conference was hosted by the Department of Environmental Science of Nankai University, with support from CERC China. During ...

  • A healthy urban habitat

    Half the world's population live in cities. By 2050, the total number of urban dwellers is expected to nearly double, rising from 3.3 billion to 6.4 billion1. How do we accommodate urbanisation while ensuring good quality of life and health? How do we minimise environmental damage but still develop our cities? This thematic issue provides a window into the research evidence that can help us ...

  • International Urban Transport Pollution and Modelling Conference in Tianjin, 8 December 2016

    Hazardous smog is a very serious issue in China and currently a focus of great attention. CERC's Managing Director Dr. David Carruthers gave keynote presentations at the International Urban Transport Pollution and Modelling conference in Tianjin on the 8th December 2016. The conference was hosted by the Department of Environmental Science of Nankai University, with ...

  • The Real Urban Jungle

    How well do you understand life in your own backyard? Cities and suburbs form their own unique ecosystems and ecology, where humans aren’t visitors; they are an integral component, like trees in a forest or coral in a reef. If more than half of the Earth’s people live in cities and the amount of paved surfaces in the United States is equivalent to the area of Ohio, shouldn’t our ...

  • Modelling Air Pollution Across the West Midlands (UK) using ADMS-Urban RML

    CERC are participating in the West Midlands Air Quality Improvement Programme (WM-Air), by providing regional, local and coupled modelling of air pollution in this UK region. The project aims to improve understanding of ...

  • New Air Pollution solutions released: ADMS-Urban, ADMS-Roads & ADMS-Airport 4.0

    ADMS-Urban is the comprehensive system for modelling air quality in large urban areas, cities and towns. ADMS-Roads is designed for investigating ...

  • Urban impacts on phosphorus in streams

    Although phosphorus is an essential nutrient for all life forms, essential amounts of the chemical element can cause water quality problems in rivers, lakes, and coastal zones. High concentrations of phosphorus in aquatic ecosystems are often associated with human activities in the surrounding area, such as agriculture and urban development. However, relationships between specific human ...

  • The Ebb and Flow of Urban Water

    The average homeowner in Canada pays about a penny for every three litres of water they consume. Because water is so cheap, not many people pay attention to their water bills. Nor do they think twice when they pay over a hundred times as much for virtually the same water in a plastic bottle purchased at a convenience store. We flush our toilets, wash our laundry and brush our teeth every day ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Poorest are worst affected by urban expansion

    Rapid expansion of cities has a greater negative impact on poorer inhabitants who cannot afford to move to the outskirts where the air is cleaner, according to a recent study which examined the effects of urban sprawl. Urban sprawl is characterised by rapid, expansive growth of a town or city, which is often driven by uncontrolled development of suburbs at the edges. During this two-part study, ...

  • Reducing runoff pollution in the US

    Over the past century, runaway development has paved over forests, fields and wetlands across the country. Along with urbanization has come the problem of 'urban stormwater' – rainwater that washes over dirty surfaces such as roads, buildings and lawns and becomes a major source of pollution in rivers, lakes and bays. While much has been achieved in the past 30 years to limit pollution from ...


    By Erosion Control Forum

  • Global advances in nutrient pollution

    The UK’s Thames Water and Canada-based Ostara Nutrient Recovery Technologies are to form a partnership to build and operate Europe’s first wastewater treatment facility that removes phosphorus and converts it into commercial fertilizer. However, the USGS reports that phosphorus levels in US fresh water remain high and progress is absent. American environmentalist Robert F. Kennedy, ...

  • Modifying urban rivers to increase biodiversity

    Urban rivers are typically heavily-engineered and polluted with degraded habitats. They are therefore a priority for biodiversity restoration. Research suggests that relatively simple modifications to river walls may potentially encourage biodiversity by significantly improving habitats for plants and animals. The EU’s Water Framework Directive requires good ecological status in surface waters by ...

  • Bikes’ niche in Urban transport expanding

    In a new blog entry, Worldwatch Senior Researcher Gary Gardner reports on efforts worldwide to improve urban cycling rates for environmental, health, and fiscal benefits. The District of Columbia last week opened its latest set of dedicated bike lanes, part of a citywide effort to encourage cycling. The lanes run down the middle of Pennsylvania Avenue, the busy thoroughfare that connects the U.S. ...


    By Worldwatch Institute

  • Groundwater pollution in Europe: an overview

    An overview of groundwater contaminants in Europe is provided by a recent study, which calls for more integrated monitoring using a range of indicators. Groundwater contamination presents serious health and environmental concerns. A number of Directives, including the Water Framework, Groundwater, Nitrates, Industrial Emissions and Landfill Directives, together aim to protect groundwater from ...

  • Urban Reforestation for Ground-Level Ozone Reduction

    A new study – “Reforestation as a Novel Abatement and Compliance Measure for Ground-Level Ozone” – by The Nature Conservancy, University of Florida, ENVDAT Consulting and The Dow Chemical Company (NYSE: Dow) published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Urban wastewater trends moving in the right direction

    The latest figures for wastewater treatment in Europe show improvements in collection and treatment, even if big differences remain between Member States. Frontrunners such as Austria, Germany and the Netherlands largely meet EU minimum standards for wastewater treatment with several others being very close. Newer Member States, starting from a lower baseline, have also improved overall ...

  • Mapping human health risk in urban environments

    A new study demonstrates how mapping software can be used to analyse data on heavy metal soil pollution in an urban environment. The researchers incorporated land use information to gain realistic estimates of potential risks to human health that could help inform land use planning. Human activities, including industrial manufacturing and road travel, contaminate the soil with heavy metals such ...

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