geophysical modeling News

  • New IHS Kingdom 2015 Software Delivers Major Advances in Integration of Geology, Geophysics and Engineering Workflows

    IHS (NYSE: IHS), the leading global source of information and analysis, has launched IHS Kingdom® 2015, the latest release of its innovative geoscience software. This industry-leading application offers major integration advances such as dynamic map updates, geosteering and 3-D geology and fault attributes based on patent-pending technology, further enabling geologists, geophysicists and ...


    By IHS Markit

  • Silixa to present at the American Geophysical Union’s 48th Annual Fall Meeting in San Francisco, California, USA, on 17-18 December, 2015

    Silixa will be presenting at AGU’s Fall Meeting in San Francisco, California, USA on 17 and 18 December, 2015. The first presentation, entitled Challenges in Ecohydrological Monitoring at Soil-Vegetation Interfaces: Exploiting the Potential for Fibre Optic Technologies, will detail the methodological background to a DTS based soil moisture monitoring project carried out in ...


    By Silixa Ltd

  • Promising results of environment monitoring satellite Jason-2 one week after launch

    One week has gone by since the launch, and everything is going very well with Jason-2. While the satellite is not yet in its final orbit (to be reached on 3 July), the first test measurements and calibrations have started. EUMETSAT, CNES, NASA and NOAA are cooperating to test every component of the ground segment, and results are looking very promising. The first Doris (Doppler Orbitography and ...

  • Arctic Ocean will be ice-free in 30 years

    New research says the Arctic might lose most of its ice cover in summer in as few as 30 years instead of the end of the century as was previously predicted. The amount of the Arctic Ocean covered by ice at the end of summer by then could be only about 1 million square kilometres, or about 620,000 square miles, down from today’s 4.6 million square kilometres, or 2.8 million square miles. While ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • NASA: Global Warming Will Bring More Severe Storms

    NEW YORK, New York, August 30, 2007 (ENS) - The most violent severe storms and tornadoes may become more common as Earth’s climate warms, say scientists with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NASA, using a new climate model. The scientsts predict that in a warmer climate, stronger and more severe storms can be expected, but with fewer storms overall. Previous climate model ...

  • Ancient glacial sediments drag down Louisiana`s sinking coast

    Sediments deposited into the Mississippi River Delta thousands of years ago when North America's glaciers retreated are contributing to the ongoing sinking of Louisiana's coastline, finds new research by NASA and scientists at Louisiana State University. The weight of these sediments is causing a large section of Earth's crust to sag at a rate of 0.04 to 0.3 inches a year, the study determined. ...

  • GSSI unveils the digital antenna technology

    Dual Frequency, Smart Antenna The 300/800 MHz dual-frequency antenna is GSSI’s first digital antenna. The combination of two frequencies allows users to locate targets at depths of up to 5 m (16 ft), ideal for utility, archaeological and environmental surveys. Center Frequency: 300 and 800 MHz Depth Range 0-7 m (0-21 ft) Weight: 5 kg (12 lbs) ...


    By Geomorph Instruments

  • Global warming may make monsoons harder to predict, say researchers

    Monsoons will be more difficult to predict in the future because of global warming, researchers have warned. Scientists will need improved weather prediction models, conclude researchers from the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), in a report published in Geophysical Research Letters last month (23 April). Reliable prediction of monsoon rains five to seven days in advance is ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • NASA Study Projects Warming-Driven Changes In Global Rainfall

    A NASA-led modeling study provides new evidence that global warming may increase the risk for extreme rainfall and drought. The study shows for the first time how rising carbon dioxide concentrations could affect the entire range of rainfall types on Earth. Analysis of computer simulations from 14 climate models indicates wet regions of the world, such as the equatorial Pacific Ocean and Asian ...

  • Thinning glaciers `endangering South Asian water supply`

    New evidence that Himalayan glaciers are shrinking has added weight to concerns that there could be severe water shortages in the region by 2030. Researchers drilling an ice core in the 6,050 metre-high Naimona'nyi glacier near Tibet were expecting to find radioactivity left by atomic tests carried out 50 years ago. Instead they found little more than background levels of radioactivity. The ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Sophisticated monitoring array to address mystery of uranium plume

    Scientists have been puzzled for years about why uranium contamination in groundwater continues to exceed drinking water standards in an area located at the south end of the Hanford Site. The Department of Energy wants answers to why the uranium persists. Now, an innovative system has been installed for field experiments to better understand this complex site and to support future cleanup ...

  • Wildfires worse due to global warming, studies say

    The devastating wildfires scorching Southern California offer a glimpse of a warmer and more fiery future, according to scientists and federal and international reports. In the past three months, at least three different studies and reports have warned that wildfires are getting bigger, that man-made climate change is to blame, and it's only going to get worse with more fires starting ...


    By Associated Press

  • Scientists say lakes to feel climate change impact

    German and Japanese scientists have discovered that lakes located in the planet's warmer and colder regions will fall victim to climate change. Their data showed that the deep water layers of lakes in the south of Japan recorded higher temperatures, whereas temperatures of those in the north of the country were unchanged. Their findings were published in the Geophysical Research Letters. The ...

  • Triad expedites brownfields redevelopment in Fairbanks

    The Fairbanks North Star Borough (FNSB) used Triad in 2006-2007 to assess environmental conditions at a municipal property along the Chena River in Fairbanks, AK. FNSB accelerated the site investigation as part of a brownfields assessment grant received from the U.S. EPA in 2005. Low-level contamination had been identified onsite in past investigations, but its extent and impact on future ...

  • Climate change and unpredictable weather, what should we expect

    Recent research published in Geophysical Research Letters shows unexpected changes in global precipitation rates.  ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

  • Study links African drought to Pacific sea temperature

    Researchers in the United States have found a link between low rainfall in East Africa during the March-May rainy season, and changes in sea surface temperature in the tropical Pacific Ocean. The region endured a catastrophic ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • ESA launches GOCE - heralds new chapter in Earth observation

    This week, the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) was lofted into a near-Sun-synchronous, low Earth orbit by a Rockot launcher lifting off from the Plesetsk cosmodrome in northern Russia. With this launch, a new chapter in the history of Earth observation in Europe has begun. GOCE is the first of a new family of ...


    By European Space Agency (ESA)

  • Past presents warning on greater warming

    If the distant past is anything to go by, then climate scientists may have under-estimated the hazards of greenhouse gases, and future global warming could be a lot worse than anybody thought. The calculation rests on two things. One is a detailed reconstruction of rising greenhouse gas concentrations and an interlude of ...


    By Climate News Network

  • First images from ESA’s water mission

    In less than four months since launch, the first calibrated images are being delivered by ESA’s SMOS mission. These images of 'brightness temperature' translate into clear information on global variations of soil moisture and ocean salinity to advance our understanding of the water cycle.  Launched on 2 November, the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission is improving our ...


    By European Space Agency (ESA)

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