Algal Bloom Control News

  • How much phosphorus pollution makes lakes unsafe for recreation?

    A target level of 20 micrograms of phosphorus per litre of lake water could help keep many lakes safe for recreation by restricting the growth of harmful algal blooms, European research suggests. The scientists analysed the relationship between phosphorus levels in medium- and high-alkalinity lakes, the growth of cyanobacteria blooms and the concentrations of cyanobacteria that trigger World ...

  • EPA Awards Grants in Michigan and Ohio to Improve Water Quality and Reduce Algal Blooms in the Great Lakes

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today announced 11 Great Lakes Restoration Initiative grants for projects in Michigan and Ohio to improve water quality and reduce excess nutrients that contribute to harmful algal blooms in Great Lakes watersheds. Cameron Davis, Senior Advisor to the EPA Administrator for the Great Lakes, highlighted seven GLRI grants for projects to reduce nutrients in ...

  • Chelsea completes demonstration of the new FastOcean System in Baltimore

    Last week in Baltimore harbour, Dr Kevin Oxborough demonstrated Chelsea’s 3rd generation Fast Repetition Rate Fluorometer - the new FastOcean  System  -  to groups from  University of Maryland Chesapeake Bay Laboratory, Moss Landing Marine Laboratory and University of Michigan Cooperative Institute for Limnology and Ecosystems Research.    The FastOcean ...


    By Chelsea Technologies Group

  • Cutting nutrient pollution may curb harmful algal blooms

    Reducing nitrogen and phosphorus pollution may be an easier, more effective way to control harmful algal blooms in water than addressing warming temperatures, say researchers. Cyanobacteria, also known ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Cheap local clay kills harmful algae, study finds

    Local clay could help control the harmful algal blooms that destroy fish catch in the Philippines, according to researchers. Scientists at the University of the Philippines' Marine Science Institute found that the blooms — commonly known as red tide — can be mitigated by spraying 'ball clay', which ...


    By SciDev.Net

  • Black substance in Anacostia river

    Test results of water samples taken from the Anacostia River show that a black substance that has plagued a portion of the river since mid-August is a rare algal bloom, the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency announced today. Initial testing by biologists from EPA and the Maryland Department of the Environment ruled out that the discoloration was a petroleum product or other hazardous ...

  • Aquarium of Veracruz (Acuario De Veracruz) receives gulf guardian award

    The Gulf of Mexico Program recently announced that Aquarium of Veracruz, Veracruz, Mexico will receive a Gulf Guardian Award for 2011 in the Binational Category for their Harmful Algal Blooms monitoring program. The Awards ceremony will be held in conjunction with the Gulf of Mexico Alliance Meeting on August 3, 2011, beginning at 6 p.m. in the Ballroom at the Westin New Orleans Canal Place in ...

  • New Mexico RWA 2011 Conference

    Hillsboro, OR (February 25, 2011) GillTrading.com, Inc. proudly announces the opportunity to present the paper “Methods for Reducing Maintenance in Grease Collection Areas” at the upcoming NMRWA 2011 Conference on April 11.  Shawna Gill, D.C., CEO of GillTrading.com, Inc. and the presenter and co-author of the paper, stated, “The pilot study conducted in Jewett City, CT ...


    By GillTrading.com, Inc.

  • Algal bloom research award

    NOAA has awarded USD543,336 for two competitive grants to better understand and manage outbreaks of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) which threaten public health and fisheries in Puget Sound. The grants cover the first year of multi-year projects, anticipated to cost almost USD1.5 million over the next three years. The goal of the first project is to develop a forecasting ability to identify which ...

  • Phosphorus pollution research in great lakes

    NOAA has awarded New York-based Stony Brook University USD285,895 as part of an anticipated three-year, nearly USD500,000 project to determine how different kinds of phosphorous, a nutrient required by all plants for growth, trigger toxic blooms of blue-green algae in the Great Lakes. The project will focus on the algal species Microcystis, which frequently causes massive and unsightly blooms in ...


  • Algal bloom in baltic sea

    This Envisat image, with courtesy of ESA, captures blue-green algae blooms filling the Baltic Sea, which is roughly 1,600km long, 190km wide and has a surface area of about 377,000 sq km. "Algae bloom" is the term used to describe the rapid multiplying of phytoplankton, microscopic marine plants that drift on or near the surface of the sea. Floating freely in the water, phytoplankton are ...


  • Remote, underwater detection of harmful algae

    This achievement represents a significant milestone in NOAA's effort to monitor the type and toxicity of harmful algal blooms (HABs). HABs are considered to be increasing not only in their global distribution, but also in the frequency, duration, and severity of their effects. HABs damage coastal ecosystem health and pose threats to humans as well as marine life. Climate change is expected to ...


  • Changing climate may lead to devastating loss of phosphorus from soil

    Crop growth, drinking water and recreational water sports could all be adversely affected if predicted changes in rainfall patterns over the coming years prove true, according to research published in April in Biology and Fertility of Soils. Scientists from Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC)-funded North Wyke Research have found for the first time that the rate at ...


    By ScienceDaily

  • China tackles algae in Olympic venue

    More than 10,000 Chinese soldiers and civilians have been sent in to clear up a giant algal bloom threatening this summer's Olympic sailing events. The algae, first spotted in late May, has choked large stretches of coast around the Eastern city of Qingdao, according to local media. Workers are now heading out to sea every day to collect thousands of tonnes of algae around the city, which will ...

  • Ruining the world’s water supply

    Agricultural run-offs containing fertilizers, animal wastes and pesticides are infecting rivers and water courses with blue-green algal blooms and toxic chemicals. While the problem is particularly evident in developing countries - Canada, Australia and the United States contain some of the world’s most polluted rivers, and poor agricultural practices are the root cause. Almost one-fifth ...


    By GLOBE SERIES

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