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Water Dechlorination Applications

  • Cyanide Treatment with Hydrogen Peroxide

    Cyanides are used in a number of chemical synthesis and metallurgical processes (as simple salts or cyanide complexes). As a class, cyanides are highly toxic and must be destroyed or removed from wastewaters prior to discharge. The most common method for treating free or simple cyanide is alkaline chlorination. However, chlorination of cyanide results in highly toxic intermediates (e.g., cyanogen chloride) and, if organic material is present, chlorinated VOC’s. These compounds, together with the residual chlorine, create additional environmental problems. Consequently, there is a growing need for alternative, non-chlorine methods for destroying cyanides. Peroxygen compounds such as hydrogen peroxide, peroxymonosulfuric acid (1), and persulfates (1) are effective alternatives to alkaline chlorination for destroying free and complexed cyanides. The choice of peroxygen system depends on the reaction time available, the desired products (cyanate, or CO2 and NH3), the types of cyanides being treated (free, weak acid dissociable, or inert), and the system economics. Treatment with Hydrogen Peroxide While hydrogen peroxide will oxidize free cyanide, it is common to catalyze the reaction with a transition metal such as soluble copper, vanadium, tungsten or silver in concentrations of 5 to 50 mg/L (2).

    By USP Technologies based in Atlanta, GEORGIA (US) (USA).

  • Water quality monitoring systems for high water purifier industry

    The monitoring of “Ultra Pure Water” or “High Purity Water” requires the lowest possible detection limits for process analyzers. Resistivity is often around 18 MΩ. Dedicated instruments can detect infinitely small amounts (ppt e.g. parts per trillion) of ions.

    By SWAN Analytische Instrumente AG based in Hinwil, SWITZERLAND.

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    Oxidation Reduction Potential (ORP)/Redox

    Oxidation Reduction Potential or Redox is the activity or strength of oxidizers and reducers in relation to their concentration. Oxidizers accept electrons, reducers lose electrons. Examples of oxidizers are: chlorine, hydrogen peroxide, bromine, ozone, and chlorine dioxide. Examples of reducers are sodium sulfite, sodium bisulfate and hydrogen sulfide. Like acidity and alkalinity, the increase of one is at the expense of the other.

    By Myron L Company based in Carlsbad, CALIFORNIA (USA).

  • Enhanced anaerobic biodegradation for the soil and groundwater industry

    Enhanced anaerobic biodegradation is the practice of adding hydrogen (an electron donor) to groundwater and/or soil to increase the number and vitality of indigenous microorganisms performing anaerobic bioremediation (reductive dechlorination) on any anaerobically degradable compound or chlorinated contaminant. The most commonly targeted chlorinated groundwater contaminants are primarily used in industry as degreasing agents and include: Perchloroethylene (PCE), Trichloroethylene (TCE), Dichloroethylene (DCE), Vinyl Chloride (VC).

    Other anaerobically degradable compounds include: carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, methylene chloride, certain pesticides/herbicides, perchlorate, nitrate, nitroaromatic explosives (TNT, RDX), dyes and chlorofluorocarbons (CFC’s).

    By REGENESIS based in San Clemente, CALIFORNIA (USA).

  • Industrial water TOC and Color removal from water

    All surface waters contain varying amounts of naturally occurring organic acids. The most commonly encountered being tannic and humic. These substances have varying molecular weights and varying amounts of carboxylic functionality. There has been much interest in the removal of these substances from drinking water supplies due to their tendency to form THM`s when chlorinated. They can be removed effectively by use of anion exchange resins operated in the chloride cycle. Because the organics can be removed by regeneration with brine, this technology is far most economical.

    By PuriTech Ltd based in Herentals, BELGIUM.

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    Water Treatment Solutions for Hydrogen Sulfide

    Sulfates and hydrogen sulfide are both common nuisance contaminants. Although neither is usually a significant health hazard, sulfates can have a temporary laxative effect on humans and young livestock. Sulfates also may clog plumbing and stain clothing. Hydrogen sulfide produces an offensive `rotten egg` odor and taste in the water, especially when the water is heated.

    By Adedge Water Technologies, LLC based in Buford, GEORGIA (US) (USA).

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