DustWatch cc

OH Training Course

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The course has three main sections. Fallout dust monitoring theory. Fallout dust monitoring practical. Miscellaneous occupational hygiene topics. Gravimetric sampling, isokinetic sampling, ventilation, noise, illumination, ergonomics, fire and safety, and others.

The fall-out dust monitoring section of the course aims to train the trainees so that they are able to do the following.

  1. Understand what fall-out dust monitoring achieves and what is collected. This will include discussion around the legislative requirements and will also address the possible influences of dust sensitive areas like communities, hospitals, farms, and recreational areas.
  2. Prepare buckets, transport buckets and change buckets in the Fallout Dust Monitoring units.
  3. Filter the bucket contents using a filter bench and using the related equipment used in the filtering process. This includes advice on how to minimise the filtering time and what can be done when samples are taking very long to filter.
  4. Understand how to calculate the fall-out dust monitoring results in mg/m2/day and how to interpret these results.
  5. Report writing and presentation options for the results will also be discussed.
  6. Some computer training may also be included in the course if required.
  7. Access to our software for processing of the fall-out dust data will also be included after the course. This can be used to simplify the data collection and report writing and will also provide a database of the fall-out dust levels over the years.
  8. Certificates will be provided on completion of the training.

Day 1

08:45 Registration
09:00 Welcome and Who is Who
09:15 Introduction to Environmental Monitoring - Fallout Dust
09:45 Discussion and Comments
10:00 What is precipitant Dust - Fallout Dust.
10:45 Discussion and Comments
11:00 Break
11:15 How to collect Fallout Dust
12:00 Discussion and comments
12:15 Particle Size and settling velocity.
13:00 Lunch
13:45 How to Calculate fall-out dust results and Interpretation of the results.
14:30 Discussion and Comments
14:45 Trace Element Analysis and Fingerprinting
15:15 Break
15:30 Microscanning
16:00 General Discussion time and practical examples
17:00  End

Possible other topics for discussion:

PM 10 discussion
Relation of Fallout dust to PM10

Day 2

09:00 Welcome and Names
09:15 Practical training of bucket changes and filtering procedure.
11:00 Break
11:15 Report writing and presentation options for the results will also be discussed. Computer training as required. Any aspects of computer training can be discussed. Computer skills are important for performing tasks efficiently when using a computer.

13:00 Lunch
13:45 Access to our software for processing of the fall-out dust data will also be included after the  course. This can be used to simplify the data collection and report writing and will also provide a  database of the fall-out dust levels over the years.  If time allows, other aspects can be discussed to suit the specific requirements of the people being trained.
16:00 Discussion and Comments
16:30 Certificates

Introduction

Looking up at the sky, we would never guess that our atmosphere contains between one and three billion tons of dust and other particles at any given time. Wind assists in keeping this dust airborne, but gravity wins most of the time, forcing the dust particles earthward, proving the old adage: “what goes up, must come down.”

Dust comes from many different sources. Some, like the byproducts of the combustion of fossil fuels, are man-made. Others
come from natural sources – like sea-spray blowing off the ocean, or dust blowing in from the desert. Dust comprises inorganic matter, such as sand particles, as well as a large amount of organic matter, including pollen, spores, moulds and viruses. These minute particles, ranging in size from around 100 micro metres (µm) to a few nano metres (nm)3, invade our airspace every day, a part of life that we aren’t even aware of, except when we dust the furniture!

Definitions

  • Aerodynamic diameter - the diameter of a spherical particle that has a density of 1g/cm3 and which has the same terminal settling velocity as the particle of interest.
  • Atmospheric dust – Dust that is in the atmosphere.
  • Brownian Motion – The continual random movement, due to molecular agitation, of fine particles suspended in a gas or a liquid.
  • d50 – In a sample of dust the d50 diameter is the diameter above which fifty percent of the particles are larger and below which fifty percent of the particles are smaller.
  • Dry deposition – The collection of precipitant dust during periods with no rainfall.
  • Export bucket – The export bucket can be the North, South, East or West bucket that is closest to the dust sources. When the wind blows over the dust source towards the sampling location then the export bucket is open and dust from the dust source is collected in the bucket.
  • Fugitive dust – Dust that is not emitted from a point source that can be easily defined such as stacks. Sources are open fields, travel-ways, stockpiles and process-buildings.
  • Meteorology – the earth science dealing with phenomena of the atmosphere (especially weather).
  • Occult deposition – Increasing particle size due to moisture that results in deposition due to increased mass of particle.
  • PM2 .5 – Sampling of atmospheric dust where the aerodynamic d50 diameter is 2.5 µm.
  • PM10 – Sampling of atmospheric dust where the aerodynamic d50 diameter is 10 µm.
  • Precipitant dust – Any particulate matter that has an aerodynamic diameter below 100 µm.
  • Total deposition – The sum of wet and dry deposition. Occult deposition is also included.
  • Wet deposition – The collection of precipitant dust and any soluble substances in the rainwater during periods of rainfall.

Definition of monitoring:

Keep the focus on using the tool to create awareness and achieve the objective of monitoring which is to create awareness of environmental pollution.

The design of a monitoring program must therefore have regard for the final use of the data before monitoring starts.

Environmental monitoring - The process of checking, observing, or keeping track of something for a specified period of time or at specified intervals.

Environmental monitoring must have a goal in mind and be linked to a problem or potential problem.

Keep it simple initially and then as the monitoring identifies problems, the results can be used to include more complicated results. Reports should be easy to read and understand.

It is important to keep the big picture in focus when running a monitoring programme, while still maintaining high levels of quality control.

What is Precipitant Dust

Precipitant dust, as the word implies, is dust that precipitates or falls down. It refers to any particle with an aerodynamic diameter less than 100 µm and precipitant dust is broadly defined as particulate that ranges in size up to 100 µm in diameter.

  1. Inhalable particulate mass is for those materials that are hazardous when deposited anywhere in the respiratory tract. This is the particulate that will pass from the air into the nose or mouth and will travel up to the beginning of the throat.
  2. Thoracic Particulate mass is for those materials that are hazardous when deposited anywhere within the lung airways and the gas-exchange region. This is the particulate that will pass through the throat and up to the small bronchiole.
  3. Respirable particulate mass is for those materials that are hazardous when deposited in the gas-exchange region.

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